Page images
PDF
EPUB

A HISTORY AND A DIARY.

BT

DAVID URQUHART,

AUTHOR OF

"THE SPIRIT OF THE BAST," "THE PILLARS OF HERCULES,"
"TURKEY AND ITS RESOURCES," ETC.

TWO VOLUMES.
VOL. II.

LONDON:

THOMAS CAUTLEY NEWBY,

SO, WELBECZ STEEET, CAVENDISH SQUARE.

1860.

[The right of translation it reterved.']

[graphic]

VOLUME II.

DIARY IN THE LEBANON.

CHAPTER I.

Page. Maronite Convents . . . .1

CHAPTER II. The Caimacan of the Maronites . . .23

CHAPTER HI. Tripoli . . . . . 4A

CHAPTER IV. Various things, Religious and Secular . . 70

CHAPTER V. The Children of Eden, and the Cedars of God . . 91

CHAPTER VI. Bise of the Tiers Etat . . . .113

CHAPTER VII. The Patriarch . . . . .130

CHAPTER VIII.

The Provincial Parliament—An Impeachment — Public Lands . . . . . . 152

CHAPTER IX. An Interlude—An Arab Theatre . . . 178

CHAPTER X. Restoration of Ancient Harbours and Water Works . 190

IV

Page CHAPTER XI.

Antipathy to Punishment .... 217 CHAPTER XII.

A Civil War arranged by Sheik Said, but frustrated . 235

CHAPTER XIII. Maronite connexion with France . . . 251

CHAPTER XIV. The Shaab . . . . .271

CHAPTER Xy. A Dmze . . . . .297

CHAPTER XVI.

Antiquity of the Souriana .... 323 CHAPTER XVII.

The System of Protection .... 341

CHAPTER XVIII. Turkish Finances . . . .362

CHAPTER XIX. The Antediluvian World-- Baalbeth . . . 369

CHAPTER XX. An Emir Beshir .... 391

CHAPTER XXI. Agony of Ten Years .... 403

CHAPTER XXII. Christianity of the Lebanon . - . . 433

CHAPTER XXIII. Public Meeting - . . . . 437

Catastjiophe . . . ... . 445

DIARY IN THE LEBANON.

CHAPTER I.

MARONITE CONVENTS.

ft

The day having suddenly brightened, I had time to reach Emir Hydar's residence, and rejoiced to quit the den where I had been confined in darkness and smoke, though not sorry to have gone through it. I had begun to appreciate vividly the inconvenience of winter travelling in the Lebanon; but so soon as I had emerged into the open air, and looked around on the prospect, the sun glistening on the snowy crests, and on the green tops of the pines, and penetrating to the red earth from which they grew, or rather seemed to stretch themselves, I again forgot the toil and inconveniences, and applauded my resolution; for such fresh sweet air, such bright colours, no other season could produce.

We found the population scattered through the thin pine forests, gathering wood and digging out roots. I eyed them now with a haberdasher's eye, and scrutinized each Meintan and Jeleck, knowing the value of each piece of stuff. I found that I

« PreviousContinue »