Moral Teachings of Islam: Prophetic Traditions from Al-Adab Al-Mufrad

Front Cover
AltaMira Press, 2003 - Religion - 132 pages
In Islamic life and tradition, Hadith sayings enshrine the most important teachings after the Qur'an itself. Derived from the Sunnah or teachings of the Prophet and his Companions and their followers, these precepts were collected under the title Al-Adab al-mufrad-meaning 'Good behaviour singled out'-by Imam al-Bukhari in the ninth century CE. The Hadith sayings in al-Bukhari's writings formed a large corpus that covered the way Muslims should conduct their lives, from duties to parents, family, relatives, neighbors and friends, to instruction about honesty, generosity, truthfulness and kindness. While al-Bukhari's original text runs to many hundreds of pages forming several volumes, Abdul Hamid has made a selection of the teachings that has relevance and appeal to today's readership, with appeal not only to Muslims but to all who seek to know more of the essence of Islamic life and teachings.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Imam alBukhari
6
AlAdab almufrad
7
Glossary
9
Acknowledgments
11
Kindness to parents
13
The sin of disobeying parents
14
Obeying parents is obligatory unless it leads to sin
15
Visiting a nonMuslim sick person
68
A visitors prayer for the sick
69
Women visiting a sick man
70
Pride and arrogance
71
Defending oneself
73
Keeping sheep goats and camels
74
Patience in all conditions
75
Accepting gifts
76

The gravity of abusing parents
16
Kindness to parents after their death
17
Being good to ones fathers friends
18
The virtue of upholding the ties of kinship
19
A mans responsibility to his family
20
Maintaining the ties of kinship prolongs life
21
Those to whom Allah shows no mercy
22
The virtue of supporting a daughter who has returned
23
The selflessness of mothers
24
A fathers gift to his children
25
The rights of neighbours
26
Letting a neighbour go hungry
27
A neighbours complaint
28
The household in which an orphan is well treated
29
Good character
31
Striking a slave or other person
32
Treatment of slaves
33
Spending on a slave or servant is charity
34
The position of the slave
35
Repaying a favour
36
Doing good in this world is rewarded in the Hereafter
37
Removing harmful objects from the street
38
Pointing another in the direction of good
39
Laughing and smiling
40
Love one another
41
Good behaviour
42
Generosity and kindness
44
Meanness
45
Wellearned money for a good person
46
A believer is not given to cursing
47
Telling tales
48
Praising others appropriately
49
Visiting people
50
The merit of elders
51
Elders should be allowed to speak before the young
52
Kindness to all people
53
Kindness to animals
54
It is never good to lie
55
Restoring relations
56
Hatred and rancour
57
Deception and trickery
58
Abusing a Muslim is iniquitous
59
Criticizing people to their faces
60
Malicious delight in the misfortune of others
61
Building a house
62
Making money
63
Illness is an atonement for sin
64
The good done by someone before falling ill is recorded as though continuing
66
Raising the hands in supplication
77
Praying for someone without his knowledge
78
Invoking the blessing of Allah on the Prophet
79
Prayers will be answered if the supplicant is not impatient
80
Some prayers of the Prophet
81
Supplication in time of difficulty
83
The virtue of supplication
84
Seeking refuge from severe trial
85
Backbiting
86
Honouring and serving a guest
87
Spending on ones family
89
Covering up for a Muslim
90
Wishes that may not be granted as expected
91
Poetry
92
Human souls are like detachments of soldiers
93
On seeing rain clouds
94
Etiquette concerning sneezing
95
Yawning
96
Searching anothers head for lice
97
Shaking hands
98
Promoting the Islamic form of greeting
99
The virtue of greeting
100
Waving a hand in greeting
101
Greeting a person asleep
102
Greeting children
103
Revelation of the verse about the veil
104
Asking permission to enter a house
105
Not giving ones name when asked who is there
106
The righteousness of the man who says the greeting before entering his house
107
How to reply when asked how you are
108
Sitting by the wayside
109
Sitting on a raised object
110
Listening to private conversations
111
Offering a visitor a cushion
112
Squatting on ones heels
113
Kneeling down
114
Using the right hand for giving and taking
115
What to say in the evening
116
Placing a hand under the cheek
117
Closing the doors at night
118
Tahnik of the newborn baby
119
A believer is not stung twice by the same swarm
120
Loyalty
121
The most wretched person is one who is avoided for bad language or deeds
122
Keeping quiet despite being angry
123
The Supplications in Arabic and in Transliteration
125
Copyright

Other editions - View all

About the author (2003)

Dr. Abdul Ali Hamid teaches at The Muslim College, London, and is an authority on Arabic language and literature.

Bibliographic information