Punch, Volumes 16-17

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Punch Publications Limited, 1849 - Caricatures and cartoons
 

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Page 67 - Where are you, old companions trusty Of early days here met to dine? Come, waiter! quick, a flagon crusty — I'll pledge them in the good old wine. The kind old voices and old faces My memory can quick retrace; Around the board they take their places, And share the wine and Bouillabaisse. There's Jack has made a wondrous marriage; There's laughing Tom is laughing yet; There's brave Augustus drives his carriage; There's poor old Fred in the Gazette...
Page 243 - And licked the soup from the cook's own ladles, Split open the kegs of salted sprats, Made nests inside men's Sunday hats, And even spoiled the women's chats, By drowning their speaking With shrieking and squeaking In fifty different sharps and flats. At last the people in a body To the Town Hall came flocking :
Page 67 - Ah me ! how quick the days are flitting ! I mind me of a time that's gone, When here I'd sit, as now I'm sitting, In this same place - but not alone. A fair young form was nestled near me, A dear, dear face looked fondly up, And sweetly spoke and smiled to cheer me - There's no one now to share my cup.
Page 67 - THE BALLAD OF BOUILLABAISSE. A STREET there is in Paris famous, For which no rhyme our language yields, Rue Neuve des Petits Champs its name is — The New Street of the Little Fields. And here's an inn, not rich and splendid, But still in comfortable case ; The which in youth I oft attended, To eat a bowl of Bouillabaisse.
Page 67 - There's Jack has made a wondrous marriage; There's laughing Tom is laughing yet; There's brave Augustus drives his carriage; There's poor old Fred in the Gazette; On James's head the grass is growing : Good Lord ! the world has wagged apace Since here we set the claret flowing, And drank, and ate the Bouillabaisse. Ah me! how quick the days are flitting! I mind me of a time that's gone, When here I'd sit, as now I'm sitting, In this same place — but not alone.
Page 226 - Young ladies all, of every clime, Especially of Britain, Who wholly occupy your time In novels or in knitting, Whose highest skill is but to play. Sing, dance, or French to clack well, Reflect on the example, pray, Of excellent Miss Blackwell ! Think, if you had a brother ill, A husband, or a lover, And could prescribe the draught or pill Whereby he might recover ; How much more useful this would be, Oh, sister, wife, or daughter ! Than merely handing him beef-tea, Gruel, or toast-and-water. Ye bachelors...
Page 67 - Bouillabaisse. Where are you, old companions trusty Of early days here met to dine ? Come, waiter ! quick, a flagon crusty — I'll pledge them in the good old wine. The kind old voices and old faces My memory can quick retrace ; Around the board they take their places, And share the wine and Bouillabaisse.
Page 67 - A STREET there is in Paris famous, For which no rhyme our language yields, Rue Neuve des Petits Champs its name is — The New Street of the Little Fields ; And here's an inn, not rich and splendid. But still in comfortable case; The which in youth I oft attended, To eat a bowl of Bouillabaisse. This Bouillabaisse a noble dish is — A sort of soup or broth, or brew. Of hotchpotch of all sorts of fishes, That Greenwich never could outdo; Green herbs, red peppers, mussels, saffern, Soles, onions,...
Page 187 - Bob, a mixture of love and wit — who can equal this great genius ? There are little words and phrases in his books which are like personal benefits to the reader. What a place it is to hold in the affections of men ! What an awful responsibility hanging over a writer ! What man holding such a place, and knowing that his words go forth to vast congregations of mankind — to grown folks, to their children, and perhaps...
Page 135 - We fight for ourselves, we push for ourselves : we cut the best slices out of the joint at club-dinners for ourselves ; we yawn for ourselves and light our pipes, and say we won't go out : we prefer ourselves and our ease — and the greatest good that comes to a man from woman's society is, that he has to think of somebody besides himself — somebody to whom he is bound to be constantly attentive and respectful.

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