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INSTITUTES

OF

ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY,

ANCIENT AND MODERN.

VOL. IV.

LONDON:

GILRERT AND RIVINGTON, PRINTERS,

ST. JOHN'S SQUARE.

OP

ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY,

ANCIENT AND MODERN,

BY

JOHN LAURENCE VON MOSHEIM, D.D.

CHANCELLOR OF THE UNIVERSITY OF GOTTINGEN.

A NEW AND LITERAL TRANSLATION

FROM THE ORIGINAL LATIN, WITH COPIOUS ADDITIONAL NOTES,

ORIGINAL AND SELECTED,

BY

JAMES MURDOCK, D.D.

EDITED, WITH ADDITIONS, BY

HENRY SOAMES, M.A.

RECTOR OF STAPLE FORD TAWNEY, WITH THOY DON MOUNT, ESSEX.

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PREFACE

TO THE

FOURTH VOLUME.

Tue modern period of ecclesiastical history may be conveniently dated from the beginning of the seventeenth century. It was then that the principles of the Reformation were found firmly rooted, and the existing boundaries of their influence defined. It is true, indeed, that they were then extensively prevalent in the Austrian states, from which they were subsequently, in a very great measure, expelled. But the imperial court had never forsaken Rome, and it was supported in this adherence by a majority of the people, together with a great preponderance of the aristocracy. Austria, therefore, must be considered as entering upon the seventeenth century in that theological position which she has occupied ever since. The same may be said of France. Her powerful and intelligent population was pervaded by protestantism when the sixteenth century closed, and it so continued long afterwards. But in this case, too, the government, backed by a formidable array of aristocratic and popular support, was Romish. Hence patronage and fashion enabled papal divinity to encroach incessantly on the rival creed, until the revocation of the edict of Nantes would no longer suffer a Huguenot's voice to be openly heard in France. In most other parts of Europe the

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