A History of Our Own Times ...

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Harper & brothers, 1897 - Great Britain
 

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Page 351 - Such assent having been given, the treaty shall remain in force for ten years from the date at which it may come into operation, and further, until the expiration of twelve months after either of the high contracting parties shall give notice to the other of its wish to terminate the same...
Page 209 - DEAR SIR, — I am not surprised at your friend's anger, but he and you should know that to denounce the murders was the only course open to us. To do that promptly was plainly our best policy. But you can tell him, and all others concerned, that though I regret the accident of Lord F. Cavendish's death, I cannot refuse to admit that Burke got no more than his deserts.
Page 73 - No half-measured Acts which left the landlords with any say to the tenantry of these portions of Ireland will be of any use. They would be rendered — as past land Acts in Ireland have been — quite abortive, for the landlords will insert clauses to do away with their force. Any half-measures will only place the Government face to face •with the people of Ireland as the champions of the landlord interest.
Page 74 - The state of our fellow-countrymen in the south-west of Ireland is worse than that of any people in the world, — let alone Europe.
Page 93 - And we, we shall die, and Islam will wither away, and the Englishman straining far over to hold his loved India, will plant a firm foot on the banks of the Nile and sit in the seats of the Faithful...
Page 169 - To maintain the supremacy of the Crown, the unity of the Empire, and all the authority of Parliament necessary for the conservation of that unity...
Page 445 - (3.) If associations of schools are constituted in such manner in such areas and with such governing bodies representative of the managers as are approved by the Education Department...
Page 36 - Is it not wonderful to those who are freemen, and whose fathers had been freemen, and who hope that their children will be freemen, and who consider that freedom is an essential condition of civil life, and that without it you can have nothing great and nothing noble in political society, that we are led by an Administration, and led, I admit, by Parliament, to find ourselves in this position, that we are to march upon another body...
Page 295 - My duty terminates by calling the attention of the House to the fact, which it is really impossible to set aside, that in considering these amendments, limited as their scope may seem to some to be, we are considering a part, an essential and inseparable part, of a question enormously large, a question which has become profoundly acute, which will demand a settlement and must receive at an early date that settlement from the highest authority.
Page 233 - I am anxious to express to my people my warm thanks for the kind, and more than kind, reception I met with on going to, and returning from, Westminster Abbey, with all my children and grandchildren.

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