A classical tour through Italy. From the 6th Lond. ed, Volume 1

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Page 174 - Some felt the silent stroke of mouldering age, Some hostile fury, some religious rage : Barbarian blindness, Christian zeal conspire, And Papal piety, and Gothic fire.
Page 282 - Lucus erat, quem medium ex opaco specu fons perenni rigabat aqua. Quo quia se persaepe Numa sine arbitris velut ad congressum deae inferebat, Camenis eum lucum sacravit, quod earum ibi concilia cum coniuge sua Egeria essent.
Page 4 - Euphrates through the piece is roll'd, And little eagles wave their wings in gold. The Medal, faithful to its charge of fame, Through climes and ages bears each form and name; In one short view, subjected to our eye, Gods, emp'rors, heroes, sages, beauties, lie. With sharpen'd sight pale antiquaries pore, Th' inscription value, but the rust adore.
Page 203 - Classic dress, and the work is rather to be attributed to the end of the fifth, or the beginning of the sixth, century.
Page 200 - ... at the expense of the church and country. The palaces of these fortunate nephews are the most costly monuments of elegance and servitude ; the perfect arts of architecture, painting, and sculpture, have been prostituted in their service, and their galleries and gardens are decorated with the most precious works of antiquity, which taste or vanity has prompted them to collect.
Page 111 - I look for streams immortaliz'd in song, That lost in silence and oblivion lie, (Dumb are their fountains and their channels dry) Yet run for ever by the Muses' skill, And in the smooth description murmur still.
Page 160 - A herdsman seated on a pedestal while his oxen were drinking at the fountain, and a few passengers moving at a distance in different directions, were the only living beings that disturbed the silence and solitude which reigned around. Thus the place seemed restored to its original wildness described by Virgil, and abandoned once more to flocks and herds of cattle.
Page 163 - I have seen the walls of Balclutha, but they were desolate. The fire had resounded in the halls; and the voice of the people is heard no more. The stream of Clutha was removed from its place by the fall of the walls. The thistle shook there its lonely head: the moss whistled to the wind. The fox looked out from the windows, the rank grass of the wall waved round its head. Desolate is the dwelling of Moina; silence is in the house of her fathers.
Page 334 - This scene, illuminated by a sun that never shines so bright on the less favoured regions beyond the Alps, is justly considered as the most splendid and beautiful exhibition which nature perhaps presents to the human eye, and cannot but excite in the spectator, when beheld for the first time, emotions of delight and admiration that border on enthusiasm.
Page 159 - Palatine hill with the imperial residence glittering on its summit, and there by the Capitol, with its ascending ranges of porticos and of temples. Thus it presented one of the richest exhibitions that eyes could behold, or human ingenuity invent. In the midst of these superb monuments, the memorials of their greatness, and the trophies of their fathers, the Roman people assembled to exercise their sovereign power, and to decide the fates of heroes, of kings, and of nations. Nor did the contemplation...

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