Specimens of English Prose Writers: From the Earliest Times to the Close of the Seventeenth Century, Volume 1

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1807 - Authors, English
 

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Page 259 - ... and thou were the kindest man that ever struck with sword; and thou were the goodliest person that ever came among press of knights; and thou were the meekest man and the gentlest that ever ate in hall among ladies; and thou were the sternest knight to thy mortal foe that ever put spear in the rest.
Page 474 - He married my sisters with five pound, or twenty nobles apiece ; so that he brought them up in godliness and fear of God. He kept hospitality for his poor neighbours, and some alms he gave to the poor. And all this he did of the said farm, where he that now hath it payeth sixteen...
Page 252 - I, according to my copy, have done set it in imprint, to the intent that noble men may see and learn the noble acts of chivalry, the gentle and virtuous deeds that some knights used in those days, by which they came to honour; and how they that were vicious were punished and oft put to shame and rebuke...
Page 474 - In my time my poor father was as diligent to teach me to shoot as to learn (me) any other thing ; and so, I think, other men did their children. He taught me how to draw, how to lay my body in my bow, and not to draw with strength of arms, as other nations do, but with strength of the body.
Page 478 - Well then, quoth Master More, how say you in this matter ? What think ye to be the cause of these shelves and flats that stop up Sandwich haven ? Forsooth, Sir, quoth he, I am an old man ; I think that Tenterton steeple is the cause of Goodwin sands. For I am an old man, Sir...
Page 50 - Sheffield, a mercer, came into a house and asked for meat, and especially he asked after eggs; and the good wife answered that she could speak no French, and the merchant was angry, for he also could speak no French, but would have had eggs, and she understood him not.
Page 344 - Yea, is he yet so lusty ? Well, let the pope send him a hat when he will, Mother of God, he shall wear it on his shoulders then ; for I will leave him never a head to set it on.
Page 154 - I trust it shall be better in time coming. No more to you at this time, but the Holy Trinity have you in keeping ; and I beseech you that this bill be not seen of none earthly creature, save only yourself, &c. And this letter was indited at Topcroft, with full heavy heart, &c. By your own, MARGERY BREWS, Topcroft, February, 14/6-7, 16th E.
Page 287 - In our forefathers tyme, whan Papistrie, as a standyng poole, covered and overflowed all England, fewe bookes were read in our tong, savyng certaine bookes of chevalrie, as they sayd, for pastime and pleasure, which, as some say, were made in Monasteries by idle Monkes or wanton Chanons ; as one for example, " Morte Arthure " ; the whole pleasure of which booke standeth in two speciall poyntes, in open mans slaughter and bold bawdrye.
Page 370 - If evils come not, then our fears are vain ; And if they do, fear but augments the pain.

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