Page images
PDF
EPUB

ANALYTICAL LATIN EXERCISES.

BY THE SAME AUTHOR.

Twenty-seventh Edition, 104th Thousand.

Price 35. 6d., cloth.
ENGLISH GRAMMAR,

INCLUDING GRAMMATICAL ANALYSIS.

Fourth Edition, 21st Thousand.

Price 35. 6d.

A SHORTER ENGLISH GRAMMAR,

WITH COPIOUS AND CAREFULLY GRADUATED EXERCISES.

Eleventh Edition, 48th Thousand.

Price 25., cloth.

OUTLINES OF ENGLISH GRAMMAR.

Fifth Edition, 18th Thousand.

Price 3d., cloth.

FIRST NOTIONS OF GRAMMAR.

ANALYTICAL LATIN EXERCISES.

PART II.

COMPOSITION AND DERIVATION OF WORDS, AND

COMPLEX SENTENCES,

WITH THE

ANALYSIS OF SENTENCES APPLIED TO LATIN.

BY

C. P. MASON, B.A., F.C.P.,

FELLOW OF UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, LONDON.

FOURTH EDITION.

LONDON:
BELL & SONS, YORK STREET, COVENT GARDEN.

1885.

Losga

[blocks in formation]

London : Pardon & Sons, Printers, Paternoster Row, and Wine Office Court.

PREFACE.

[ocr errors]

In this Second Part of my 'Analytical Latin Exercises’ I have introduced what, so far as I know, has not been attempted before ; that is, a systematic exhibition of the formation and force of Compound and Derived Words. The pupil is trained to analyse and form these for himself, and so acquires readiness and confidence in dealing with new and complex words, while he gets a clear and vivid idea of their real signification, and of the way in which secondary and metaphorical meanings spring out of those which are primary. Great care has been taken to bring together examples which will enable the learner almost involuntarily to carry on this analysis for himself. The importance of this method for acquiring a sound knowledge of Latin, and the power of translating and writing it with accuracy and vigour, cannot be overrated.

This etymological process is carried on simultaneously with a careful development of the structure of subordinate clauses of all kinds, especially those in which the Subjunctive Mood is employed. It is hoped that this perplexing subject has been freed from its most formidable difficulties by the method adopted, which consists in a System of Contrast, based upon perpetual reference to the primary functions of the moods. In this way the root-idea of the Subjunctive Mood is differentiated into its various applications, and the constructions in which it is employed are brought under the dominion of one and the same underlying principle. It may easily be imagined that to interweave the etymological and the syntactical portions of the work was a task of no small difficulty.

Especial pains have been bestowed upon the structure of hypothetical sentences, as to which many grammars and exercise-books are full of mistakes. The safest guides are Madvig, Key, and Roby.

« PreviousContinue »