Strictures on mr. O'Connell's letters to the Wesleyan Methodists

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Page 72 - Israel is slain upon thy high places : how are the mighty fallen ! Tell it not in Gath, publish it not in the streets of Askelon ; lest the daughters of the Philistines rejoice, lest the daughters of the uncircumcised triumph.
Page 55 - Setting then religion aside, it is plain, that upon principles of reason, no government ought to tolerate men who cannot give any security to that government for their allegiance and peaceable behaviour. But this no Romanist can do, not only while he holds that ' No Faith is to be kept with Heretics,' but so long as he acknowledges either priestly absolution or the spiritual power of the Pope.
Page 23 - STAND fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free, and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondage.
Page 69 - I prove thus. It is a Roman Catholic maxim, established, not by private men, but by a public council, that 'no faith is to be kept with heretics.' This has been openly avowed by the council of Constance; but it never was openly disclaimed. Whether private persons avow or disavow it, it is a fixed maxim of the Church of Rome. But as long as it is...
Page 69 - No faith is to be kept with heretics." This has been openly avowed by the Council of Constance : but it never was openly disclaimed. (Whether private persons avow or disavow it.) It is a fixed maxim of the Church of Rome. But as long as it is so...
Page 69 - I insist upon it, that no Government not Roman Catholic ought to tolerate men of the Roman Catholic persuasion.
Page 69 - The power of dispensing with any promise, oath or vow, is another branch of the spiritual power of the pope. And all who acknowledge his spiritual power, must acknowledge this. But whoever acknowledges the dispensing power of the pope, can give no security of his allegiance to any government.
Page 44 - A day or two since a kind of answer to this was put into my hand, which pronounces "its style contemptible, its reasoning futile, and its object malicious." On the contrary, I think the style of it is clear, easy and natural; the reasoning (in general) strong and conclusive; the object, or design, kind and benevolent. And in pursuance of the same kind and benevolent design, namely, to preserve our happy constitution, I shall endeavour to confirm the substance of that tract, by a few plain arguments....
Page 81 - With persecution I have nothing to do. I persecute no man for his religious principles. Let there be as " boundless a freedom in religion," as any man can conceive. But this does not touch the point : I will set religion, true or false, utterly out of the question. Suppose the Bible, if you please, to be a fable, and the Koran to be the Word of God.
Page 77 - Sigismund, and Pope John the 23d, in the year 1414. Before it began, the Emperor sent some Bohemian gentlemen, to conduct John Huss to Constance, solemnly promising, That he should "come and return freely, without fraud or interruption.

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