Euclid, His Life and System

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Charles Scribner's sons, 1902 - Euclid's Elements - 227 pages
 

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Page 142 - In them hath he set a tabernacle for the sun, which is as a bridegroom coming out of his chamber, and rejoiceth as a strong man to run a race. His going forth Is from the end of the heaven and his circuit unto the ends of It: and there is nothing hid from the heat thereof.
Page 174 - Let them praise the name of the Lord: for he commanded, and they were created. He hath also stablished them for ever and ever: he hath made a decree which shall not pass.
Page 133 - It is true, that a little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism; but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion: for while the mind of man looketh upon second causes scattered, it may sometimes rest in them, and go no farther; but when it beholdeth the chain of them confederate and linked together, it must needs fly to Providence and Deity.
Page 133 - Lo, these are parts of his ways: but how little a portion is heard of him? but the thunder of his power who can understand?
Page 183 - Behold also the ships, which, though they be so great, and are driven of fierce winds, yet are they turned about with a very small helm, whithersoever the governor listeth.
Page 50 - A mule and a donkey were going to market laden with wheat. The mule said 'If you gave me one measure I should carry twice as much as you, but if I gave you one we should bear equal burdens.
Page 107 - There is that scattereth, and yet increaseth; and there is that withholdeth more •than is meet, and it tendeth to poverty.
Page 179 - And he made a molten sea, ten cubits from the one brim to the other : it was round all about, and his height was five cubits : and a line of thirty cubits did compass it round about.
Page 44 - Pythagoras' theorem states that the square of the length of the hypotenuse of a right-angled triangle is equal to the sum of the squares of the lengths of the other two sides.

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