The history of the ancient town and borough of Uxbridge, by G. Redford and T.H. Riches

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Pr. and sold by William Lake, 1818 - 328 pages
 

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Page 79 - Some glossy-leaved, and shining in the sun, The maple, and the beech of oily nuts Prolific, and the lime at dewy eve Diffusing odours ; nor unnoted pass The sycamore, capricious in attire, Now green, now tawny, and ere autumn yet Have changed the woods, in scarlet honours bright.
Page 113 - Those remoter counties, they pretended, from the cheapness of labour, would be able to sell their grass and corn cheaper in the London market than themselves, and would thereby reduce their rents, and ruin their cultivation. Their rents, however, have risen, and their cultivation has been improved since that time.
Page 113 - ... of the town. They are upon that account the greatest of all improvements. They encourage the cultivation of the remote, which must always be the most extensive circle of the country. They are advantageous to the town, by breaking down the monopoly of the country in its neighbourhood. They are advantageous even to that part of the country. Though they introduce some rival commodities into the old market, they open many new markets to its produce.
Page 172 - Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord : Yea, saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labours: and their works do follow them.
Page 78 - Here Ouse, slow winding through a level plain Of spacious meads with cattle sprinkled o'er, Conducts the eye along his sinuous course Delighted.
Page 78 - Stand, never overlook'd our favourite elms, That screen the herdsman's solitary hut; While far beyond, and overthwart the stream, That, as with molten glass, inlays the vale, The sloping land recedes into the clouds; Displaying on its varied side the grace Of hedge-row beauties numberless, square tower, Tall spire, from which the sound of cheerful bells Just undulates upon the listening ear; Groves, heaths, and smoking villages remote.
Page 112 - Good roads, canals, and navigable rivers, by diminishing the expense of carriage, put the remote parts of the country more nearly upon a level with those in the neighbourhood of the town. They are upon that account the greatest of all improvements.
Page 79 - So strong the zeal to immortalize himself Beats in the breast of man, that e'en a few, Few transient years, won from the abyss abhorr'd Of blank oblivion, seem a glorious prize, And even to a clown. Now roves the eye ; And, posted on this speculative height, Exults in its command.
Page 58 - ... who should be thought necessary to be present, which went round. There were many other Rooms on either side of this great Room, for the Commissioners on either side to retire to, when they thought fit to consult by themselves, and to return again to the publick Debate; and there being good Staires at either end of the House, they never went through each other's Quarters; nor met, but in the great Room.
Page 79 - Here the gray, smooth trunks Of ash, or lime, or beech, distinctly shine, Within the twilight of their distant shades ; There, lost behind a rising ground, the wood Seems sunk, and shortened to its topmost boughs. No tree in all the grove but has its charms, Though each its hue peculiar...

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