The Complete Angler

Front Cover
Gay and Bird, 1901 - Fishing - 229 pages
 

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User Review  - Cheryl_in_CC_NV - LibraryThing

I know I read it, and certainly I struggled with it at times, and thoroughly enjoyed other bits. I just don't remember it well enough to rate it. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Cheryl_in_CC_NV - LibraryThing

I know I read it, and certainly I struggled with it at times, and thoroughly enjoyed other bits. I just don't remember it well enough to rate it. Read full review

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Page 76 - A belt of straw and ivy buds With coral clasps and amber studs : And if these pleasures may thee move, Come live with me and be my love.
Page 107 - Sweet Day, so cool, so calm, so bright, The bridal of the earth and sky, The dew shall weep thy fall to-night ; For thou must die. Sweet Rose, whose hue, angry and brave, Bids the rash gazer wipe his eye, Thy root is ever in its grave, And thou must die. Sweet Spring, full of sweet days and roses, A box where sweets compacted lie, My music shows ye have your closes, And all must die.
Page 111 - There sit by him, and eat my meat, There see the sun both rise and set : There bid good morning to next day, There meditate my time away : And angle on, and beg to have A quiet passage to a welcome grave.
Page 77 - A honey tongue, a heart of gall, Is fancy's spring, but sorrow's fall. Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses, Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies, Soon break, soon wither, soon forgotten: In folly ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw and ivy buds, Thy coral clasps and amber studs, All these in me no means can move To come to thee, and be thy love.
Page 16 - As first the lark, when she means to rejoice, to cheer herself and those that hear her; she then quits the earth, and sings as she ascends higher into the air, and having ended her heavenly employment grows then mute and sad, to think she must descend to the dull earth, which she would not touch, but for necessity.
Page 57 - ll now lead you to an honest ale-house, where we shall find a cleanly room, lavender in the windows, and twenty ballads stuck about the wall...
Page 76 - The shepherd swains shall dance and sing, " For thy delight each May morning : " If these delights thy mind may move, " Then live with me and be my love *." THE NYMPH'S EEPLY TO THE SHEPHERD.
Page 228 - Cross, and our short walk thither shall put a period to my too long discourse ; in which .my meaning was, and is, to plant that in your mind, | with which I labour to possess my own soul: that is,/ a meek and thankful heart. And, to that end, I have' shewed you that riches without them do not make any man happy.
Page 110 - I IN these flowery meads would be : These crystal streams should solace me; To whose harmonious bubbling noise I with my angle would rejoice. Sit here, and see the turtle-dove Court his chaste mate to acts of love; Or on that bank, feel the west wind Breathe health and plenty; please my mind. To see sweet dewdrops kiss these flowers. And then...

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