History of the French revolution, and of the wars resulting from that memorable event. 11 vols. [in 12. Wanting the title-leaves of vol.4,5,8].

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Page x - ... How sleep the brave, who sink to rest By all their country's wishes blest! When Spring, with dewy fingers cold, Returns to deck their hallowed mould, She there shall dress a sweeter sod Than Fancy's feet have ever trod. By fairy hands their knell is rung; By forms unseen their dirge is sung; There Honour comes, a pilgrim grey, To bless the turf that wraps their clay; And Freedom shall awhile repair To dwell, a weeping hermit, there!
Page 223 - The law is an expression of the will of the community. All citizens have a right to concur, either personally or by their representatives, in its formation. It should be the same to all, whether it protects or punishes; and all being equal in its sight, are equally eligible to all honours, places, and employments, according to their different abilities, without any other distinction than that created by their virtues and talents.
Page 224 - Those who procure, expedite, execute, or cause to be executed arbitrary orders ought to be punished...
Page 222 - THE representatives of the people of France, formed into a National Assembly, considering that ignorance, neglect, or contempt of human rights, are the sole causes of public misfortunes and corruptions of Government...
Page 224 - The unrestrained communication of thoughts and opinions being one of the most precious rights of man, every citizen may speak, write and publish freely provided he is responsible for the abuse of this liberty, in cases determined by the law.
Page 224 - X. No man ought to be molested on account of his opinions, not even on account of his religious opinions, provided his avowal of them does not disturb the public order established by the law.
Page 222 - ... ever kept attentive to their rights and their duties : that the acts of the legislative and executive powers of government, being capable of being every moment compared with the end of political institutions, may be more respected ; and also, that the future claims of the citizens, being directed by simple and incontestible principles, may always tend to the maintenance of the constitution, and the general happiness.
Page 225 - A common contribution being necessary for the support of the public force, and for defraying the other expenses of government, it ought to be divided equally among the members of the community, according to their abilities.
Page 223 - I. Men are born and always continue free, and equal in respect of their rights. Civil distinctions, therefore, can be founded only on public utility. "II. The end of all political associations is the preservation of the natural and imprescriptible rights of man; and these rights are liberty, property, security, and resistance of oppression.
Page 225 - The right to property being inviolable and sacred, no one ought to be deprived of it, except in cases of evident public necessity, legally ascertained, and on condition of a previous just indemnity.

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