The Works of John Dryden: In Verse and Prose, Volume 1

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Harper & Brothers, 1859
 

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Page 141 - From harmony, from heavenly harmony This universal frame began ; When Nature underneath a heap Of jarring atoms lay, And could not heave her head, The tuneful voice was heard from high, Arise, ye more than dead.
Page 141 - And, wondering, on their faces fell To worship that celestial sound. Less than a god they thought there could not dwell Within the hollow of that shell That spoke so sweetly and so well.
Page 188 - Fortune, that with malicious joy Does man her slave oppress, Proud of her office to destroy, Is seldom pleased to bless : Still various, and unconstant still, But with an inclination to be ill, Promotes, degrades, delights in strife, And makes a lottery of life. I can enjoy her while she's kind ; But when she dances in the wind, And shakes...
Page 129 - FAREWELL, too little and too lately known, Whom I began to think and call my own: For sure our souls were near allied, and thine Cast in the same poetic mould with mine. One common note on either lyre did strike, And knaves and fools we both abhorred alike.
Page 328 - I take imitation of an author, in their sense, to be an endeavour of a later poet to write like one who has written before him on the same subject; that is, not to translate his words, or to be confined to his sense, but only to set him as a pattern, and to write as he supposes that author would have done, had he lived in our age, and in our country.
Page 154 - Tis not the' poet, but the age is prais'd. Wit's now arriv'd to a more high degree; Our native language more refin'd and free. Our ladies and our men now speak more wit In conversation, than those poets writ.
Page 43 - Was everything by starts and nothing long ; But in the course of one revolving moon Was chemist, fiddler, statesman, and buffoon ; Then all for women, painting, rhyming, drinking, Besides ten thousand freaks that died in thinking. Blest madman, who could every hour employ With something new to wish or to enjoy...
Page 40 - And, never satisfied with seeing, bless : Swift, unbespoken pomps thy steps proclaim, And stammering babes are taught to lisp thy name : How long wilt thou the general joy detain, Starve and defraud the people of thy reign ; Content...
Page 41 - Believe me, royal youth, thy fruit must be, Or gather'd ripe, or rot upon the tree. Heav'n has to all allotted, soon or late, Some lucky revolution of their fate: Whose motions if we watch and guide with skill, (For human good depends on human will,) Our fortune rolls, as from a smooth descent, And, from the first impression, takes the bent: But, if unseiz'd, she glides away like wind; And leaves repenting folly far behind.
Page 195 - The design, the disposition, the manners, and the thoughts are all before it: where any of those are wanting or imperfect, so much wants or is imperfect in the imitation of human life, which is in the very definition of a poem.

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