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1605. formity were passed ; and under the first many

Dissenters took the sacrament, to shew their disposition in favour of the Established Church, howe. ver they might not agree with parts of the liturgy: Thus then even taking the sacrament did not prové a man to be a supporter of the Church of England. Might not a man take the sacrament, and yet consider the liturgy of the Church of England, as the most consummate bigotry ? According to Sir Williain Scott's atgument, the exclusion of Catholies from Parliament, and the existence of the Test Acts were the constitutional support of the Church of England. What then was the state of ! the Church of England in the reigns of Elizabeth, of James I. and Charles L. ? Were not these princes heads of the Church, as effectually as his présent Majesty ? Did not Charles I. fall a martyr to the Church of England ? Did not the Book of Homilies absolutely condemn whatever took place at the time of the Revolution of 1658? Did not Sacheverell, upon the authority of those Homilies, attack and stigmatize that great proceeding as impious, and utterly destructive of the Church of England? Did not the university of Oxford pass a decree in 1683, against limiting the government, describing it as one of those things, which lead to Atheism ? To use a homely phrase, be warned those vot to throw stones, whose eyes were made of glass. He lastly noticed, that Mr. Percival had said : that if he were a Catholic in a country, where the Protestant Church was established, and he had the power, he would exercise it to weaken that es

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tablishment. Mr. Fox had too good an opinion 1805. - of him to think he would. If every man were to

conceive himself at liberty, because he differed from the established religion of a country, to at

tempt to overturn it, the general tendency of suck - a principle would be to destroy all peace in the = world. He did not believe any good Catholic

would so act. He was sure no good subject, who loved his country, ought so to act.

At half past four in the morning, the ques- Division. ition upon Mr. Fox's original motion was negatived

by a majority of 212, there having been, on the division, Ayes, 124, Noes, 336,*

• Conceiving it to be a matter of no slight moment to the Irish nation, to know, who have stood forward in their interests we subjoin the following lists of the peers and Irish commoners who voted on the question :

LIST OF THE PEERS
WHO VOTED FOR GOING INTO A COMMITTEE ON THE IRISH ROMAN

CATHOLIC PETITION.

Dukes Norfolk

Somerset
Devonshire
Grafton
St. Albans

Bedford
Marquisses Buckingham

Stafford

Headfurt
Earls Derby

Suffolk
Carlisle
Albemarle
Oxford

Earls Lucan

Bessborough
Viscounts Hereford

Maynard

St. John
Lords Say and Sele

Clifton, E. Darnley
Walpole

King

Montfort
Holland
Stawell
Foley
Thurlow

1805.. The force of temperate reason and argument in · Renewed prosecution 'Tankerville

Ashburton
against
Judge Fox.
Cowper

Rawdon, E. Moira
Fitzwilliam

Grenville
Leicester

Ossory
Spencer

Dundas
Thanet ,

Yarborough
Guilford

Cawdor
Kellie

Minto
Glandore

Butler, E. Ormond
Eglintown

Carysfort
Breadalbane

Landaff,
Clapricarde

Clifden
The late hour prevented Lords Egremont, Carnarvon, Stair, 1
Hutchinson, De Clifford, and others from voting.

LIST OF THE IRISH MEMBERS
IN THE HOUSE OF COMMONS WHO VOTED IN THE MAJORITY

AGAINST THE CATHOLIC QUESTIDN.

Acheson, Hon. A. Armagh co. Knox, Hon. George, Trinity
Archdall, M. Fermanagh co. College, Dublin.
Archdall, Richard, Dundalk King, Hon. Edward, Roscom-
Boyle, Viscount, Cork county mon county
Burroughs, Sir W. Enniskillen Longfield, M. Cork city
Bagwell, J. Tipperary county Leslie, C. P. Monaghan co.
Bernard, Thomas, King's co. May, Edward, Belfast
Chipnery, Sir B. Bandon Macnaghten, E, A. Antrim co.
Castlereagh, Visc. Down co. Neville, R. Wexford town
Canning, Rt. Hon. G. Tralee Ormsby, Charles, Carlow to.
Clements, Leitrim co. Pole, Hon. W. Wellesley,
Duigenań; P Armagh city Queen's county
Falkiner, John F. Dublin co. Ram, Abel, Wexford county
Foster, Rt. Hon. J. Louth co. Rochfort, G. Westmeath co.
Fostescue, W. C. Louth co. · Sneyd, Nath. Cavan county
Fetherstone, Sir T. Longford Savage, Francis, Down county
county

Sudley, Visc. Donegall county
Hardman, Edw. Drogheda Shaw, R. Dublin city

the debates upon the Catholic question produced

1805.

Hill, Sir G. Londonderry eity Stewart, Hon. C. W. London-
Hamilton, Sir C. Dungannon d erry county .
Hamilton, Hans, Dublin co. Stewart, Right Hon. Sir John,
Jones, T. Tyrwhitt, Athlone Tyrone county.
Jones, Walter, Coleraine bor. · Stewart, James, Tyrone co.
Jephson, Denham, Mallow Tottenham, C. New Ross
Keane, Sir John, Youghall bor. Vereker, C, Limerick city

LIST OF THE IRISH MEMBERS

IN THE HOUSE OF COMMONS WHO VOTED IN THE MINORITY FOR

THE CATHOLIC QUESTION.

Bagnell, W. Carlow county Hawthorne, C. S. Downpatrick
Burton, Hon. F. Clare co. Latouche, D. Carlow county
Butler, Hon. J. Kilkenny co. Latouche, R. Kildare county
Butler, Hon. C. Kilkenny city Latouche, P. Leitrim county
Bligh, T. Meath county Latouche, J. Dublin city
Caulfield, Hon. H Armagh co. Lee, E. Waterford county
Crosbie, J. Kerry county Matthew, Right Hon. Viscount
Corry, Right Hon. I. Newry Tipperary county
Dillon, Hon. A. Mayo county Martin, R. Galway county
Fitzgerald, Rt. Hon J. Ennis Newport, Sir J. Waterford city
Fitzgerald, Right Hon. M. Odell, W. Limerick county
Kerry county

O'Brien, Sir E. Clare county
French, A. Roscommon county Ponsonby, Right Hon. W. B.
Greene, Wm. Dungarvan bor. Kilkenny county
Hume, W. H. Wicklow co. Ponsonby, G. Wicklow county
Hutchinson, Hon. C. H. Cork Somerville, Sir M. Meath co.

city

The Right Hon. D. Browne, Member for Mayo, was taken suddenly ill, and unable to attend the House.

Lord George Beresford, Member for Londonderry County ; and the Right Hon. John Beresford, Member for the County of Waterford both voted, but we have not been able to ascertain upon which side.

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1805. so powerful an effect upon the public mind, even

in despite of the great majority of parliamentary votes against it, that the deputies returned to Ireland, under the gratifying conviction, that the numerical triumph of the minister had rather forwarded, than retarded the progress of their cause with the empire at large. The Parliament was still pressed with Irish matter. The Marquis of Abercorn 'was indefatigable in his persecution of Judge Fox. His Lordship's pride and resentment were stimulated by the ferocious and blind synıpathies of the interested tools of the system, which the integrity and firmness of the judge exposed and punished. It is difficult to say, whether the malice or rashness of the judge's persecutors were predominant. It was matter of notoriety, that the whole of Lord Abercorn's parliamentary interest had been devoted to Mr. Pitt, on the special condition of his being allowed the aid and countenance of the minister in crushing the upright judge, who had virtuously dared to make head against the system. As the minister had artfully avoided making it a government question, he assumed no responsibility for the irregularities and inconsistencies of the proceedings up to the present time. The more they were impartially considered, even by the most obsequious tools of the system, the more unconstitutional in principle, and unwarrantable in practice did they appear. Nearly' two years had now elapsed, since the original ground of the alleged offences had existed, aud after the great variety and rancorous nature of the proceedings in Parlia

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