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" A species of men to whom a state of order would become a sentence of obscurity, are nourished into a dangerous magnitude by the heat of intestine disturbances ; and it is no wonder that, by a sort of sinister piety, they cherish, in their turn, the disorders... "
The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal - Page 274
1827
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The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke: A vindication of natural ...

Edmund Burke - Great Britain - 1756
...season of fulness which opened our troubles in the time of Charles the First. A species of men to whom a state of order would become a sentence of obscurity,...that, by a sort of sinister piety, they cherish, in their turn, the disorders which are the parents of all their consequence. Superficial observers consider...
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Maxims and Opinions: Moral, Political, and Economical, with ..., Volume 1

Edmund Burke - Political science - 1804
...season of fulness which opened our troubles in the time of Charles the First. A species of men to whom a state of order would become a sentence of obscurity,...no wonder that, by a sort of sinister piety, they VOL. I, G 81 cherish, in their turn, the disorders which are the parents of all their consequence....
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Maxims and opinions, moral, political and economical, with ..., Volume 1

Edmund Burke - 1804
...season of fulness which opened our troubles in the time of Charles the First. A species of men to whom a state of order would become a sentence of obscurity,...no wonder that, by a sort of sinister piety, they VOL. I. G 81 cherish, in their turn, the disorders which are the parents of all their consequence....
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An historical review of the state of Ireland from the invasion of that ...

Francis Plowden - Ireland - 1805
...opened our troubles in the time of Charles the First. A speciei of men, to whom a state of order Mould become a sentence of obscurity, are nourished into...that, by a sort of sinister piety, they cherish, in their turn, the disorders, which are the parents of all their consequence. Superficial observers consider...
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An Historical Review of the State of Ireland from the Invasion of that ...

Francis Plowden - Ireland - 1805
...Charles the First. A species of men, to whom a state of order would become :i sentence of obscurity, arc nourished into a dangerous magnitude by the heat of...that, by a sort of sinister piety, they cherish, in their turn, the disorders, which are the parents of all their consequence. Superficial observers consider...
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The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Volume 1

Edmund Burke - Great Britain - 1806
...season of fulness which opened our troubles in the time of Charles the First. A species of men to whom a state of order would become a sentence of obscurity, are nourished into a dangerons magnitude by the heat of intestine disturbances; and it is no wonder that, by a sort of sinister...
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The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Volume 1

Edmund Burke - Great Britain - 1806
...season of fulness which opened our troubles in the time of Charles the First. A species of men to whom a state of order would become a sentence of obscurity, are nourished into adangerons magnitude by the he^t of intestine disturbances ; and it is no wonder that, by a sort of...
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The British Review, and London Critical Journal, Volume 4

1812
...productions, has described the turbulent abusers of a free press*. " A species of men," says he, " to whom a state of order would become a sentence of obscurity, are nourished into a dangerous magmtude by the heat of mtestine disturbances ; and it is no wonder that, by a sort of sinister piety,...
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Maxims, Opinions and Characters, Moral, Political, and Economical, Volume 1

Edmond Burke - English literature - 1815
...season of fulness which opened our troubles in the time of Charles the First. A species of men to whom a state of order would become a sentence of obscurity,...no wonder that, by a sort of sinister piety, they VOL. I. G 81 cherish, in their turn, the disorders which are the parents of all their consequence....
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The British review and London critical journal

1821
...person with a political sanctity. All which are so many motives with " that species of men, whoare nourished into a dangerous magnitude by the heat of intestine disturbances, and to whom a state of order would become a sentence of obscurity " to do what they can to bring down majesty...
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