General biography; or, Lives, critical and historical, of the most eminent persons of all ages, countries, conditions and professions, chiefly composed by J. Aikin and W. Enfield, Volume 5

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Page 318 - Upon the whole, I have always considered him, both in his lifetime and since his death, as approaching as nearly to the idea of a perfectly wise and virtuous man as perhaps the nature of human frailty will permit.
Page 156 - I had no sooner spoken these words but a loud though yet gentle noise came from the heavens, for it was like nothing on earth, which did so comfort and cheer me that I took my petition as granted, and that I had the sign I demanded, whereupon also I resolved to print my book.
Page 156 - O Thou eternal God, author of the light which now " ' shines upon me, and giver of all inward illuminations, I do " ' beseech Thee, of thy infinite goodness, to pardon a greater " ' request than a sinner ought to make ; I am not satisfied " ' enough whether I shall publish this book " De Veritate "; if " ' it be for Thy glory, I beseech Thee give me some sign from " ' heaven ; if not, I shall suppress it.
Page 296 - An Account of the principal Lazarettos in Europe ; with various Papers relative to the Plague ! together with further observations on some Foreign Prisons and Hospitals, and additional Remarks on the present state of those in Great Britain and Ireland.
Page 252 - God with much ease,' and presently delivered into his hand a walking-staff, with which he professed he had travelled through many parts of Germany ; and he said, ' Richard, I do not give, but lend you my horse ; be sure you be honest, and bring my horse back to me, at your return this way to Oxford. And I do now give you ten groats to bear your charges to Exeter; and here is ten...
Page 156 - Being thus doubtful in my chamber one fair day in the summer, my casement being open towards the south, the sun shining clear and no wind stirring, I took my book De Veritate in my hand, and kneeling on my knees, devoutly said these words : ' O thou Eternal God, Author of the light which now shines upon me, and giver of all inward illuminations, I do beseech Thee of Thy infinite goodness to pardon a greater request than a sinner ought to make.
Page 252 - ... Richard, I do not give, but lend you my horse : be sure you be honest, and bring my horse back to me at your return this way to Oxford. And I do now give you ten groats, to bear your charges to Exeter ; and here is ten groats more, which I charge you to deliver to your Mother and tell her I send her a Bishop's benediction with it, and beg the continuance of her prayers for me. And if you bring my horse back to me, I will give you ten groats more, to carry you on foot to the College : and so God...
Page 254 - To whom the good man replied, " My dear George, if saints have usually a double share in the miseries of this life, I, that am none, ought not to repine at what my wise Creator hath appointed for me; but labour (as indeed I do daily), to submit mine to his will, and possess my soul in patience and...
Page 317 - Thus died our most excellent, and never to be forgotten friend; concerning whose philosophical opinions men will, no doubt, judge variously, every one approving, or condemning them, according as they happen to coincide or disagree with his own; but concerning whose character and conduct there can scarce be a difference of opinion. His temper, indeed, seemed to be more happily balanced, if I may be allowed such an expression, than that perhaps of any other man I have every known.
Page 373 - And Jacob said unto Pharaoh, The days of the years of my pilgrimage are an hundred and thirty years : few and evil have the days of the years of my life been, and have not attained unto the days of the years of the life of my fathers in the days of their pilgrimage.

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