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work. As you have drawn it forth, I may

claim a sort of right to the ornament and protection of your name, and to the privi. lege of publicly professing myself, with the highest esteem,

MADAM,

mend the publication of them. Though i this partiality could alone prevent your judgement from being considered as decisire in favour of the work, it is more flattering to the writer than any literary fame: if, however, you will allow me to add, that some strokes of your elegant pen hare corrected these Letters, I may hope they will be received with an attention, which will insure a candid judgement from the reader, and perhaps will enable them to make some useful impressions on those to whom they are now particularly offered.

Your much obliged friend,

and most obedient

humble servant,

HESTER CHAPONE.

T'hey only, who know how your hours are employed, and of what important value they are to the good and happiness of individuals, as well as to the delight and improvement of the public, can justly estimate my obligation to you for the time and consideration you have bestowed on this little

THE IMPRO MRS. CHAPONE'S

LETTERS

ON

THE IMPROVEMENT OF THE MIND.

IMPROVI

ON THE FIRST

My dearest

THOUGH you

who are both
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What it is only by
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you warmest ir
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LETTERS

ON THE

IMPROVEMENT OF THE MIND.

LETTER I.

ON THE FIRST PRINCIPLES OF RELIGION.

My dearest Niece;

THOUGH you are so happy as to have parents, I who are both capable and desirous of giving you all proper instruction, yet 1, who love you so ten. derly, cannot help fondly wishing to contribute something, if possible, to your improvement and welfare: And, as I am so far separated from you, that it is only by pen and ink I can offer you my sentiments, I will hope that your atiention may be engaged, by seeing on paper, from the hand of one of your warmest friends, Truths of the highest im. portance, which, though you may not find new, can never be too deeply engraven on your mind. Some of them, perhaps, may make no great impression at present, and yet may so far gain a place in your memory, as readily to return to your thoughts when occasion recalls them. And if you pay me the compliment of preserving my letters, you may possibly re-peruse them at some fùturc period, when

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