The Modern Review, Volume 1

Front Cover
J. Clarke & Company, 1880 - Religion
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 152 - And he took him aside from the multitude, and put his fingers into his ears, and he spit, and touched his tongue ; and looking up to heaven, he sighed, and saith unto him, Ephphatha, that is, Be opened. And straightway his ears were opened, and the string of his tongue was loosed, and he spake plain.
Page 159 - And we sailed away from Philippi, after the days of unleavened bread, and came unto them to Troas in five days ; where we abode seven days. 7 And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, (ready to depart on the morrow) and continued his speech until midnight.
Page 411 - And John answered and said, Master, we saw one casting out devils in thy name ; and we forbad him, because he followeth not with us. And Jesus said unto him, Forbid him not : for he that is not against us, is for us.
Page 377 - Then the eyes of the blind shall be opened, and the ears of the deaf shall be unstopped. Then shall the lame man leap as an hart and the tongue of the dumb sing, for in the wilderness shall waters break out, and streams in the desert.
Page 738 - Who through faith subdued kingdoms, wrought righteousness, obtained promises, stopped the mouths of lions. Quenched the violence of fire, escaped the edge of the sword, out of weakness were made strong, waxed valiant in fight, turned to flight the armies of the aliens.
Page 738 - They were stoned, they were sawn asunder, were tempted, were slain with the sword...
Page 232 - And the LORD opened the eyes of the young man; and he saw: and, behold, the mountain was full of horses and chariots of fire round about Elisha.
Page 617 - ... sitting by their studious lamps, musing, searching, revolving new notions and ideas wherewith to present as with their homage and their fealty the approaching reformation, others as fast reading, trying all things, assenting to the force of reason and convincement.
Page 650 - I answer: It has not and cannot have them; it is the poetry of the builders of an age of prose and reason. Though they may write in verse, though they may in a certain sense be masters of the art of versification, Dryden and Pope are not classics of our poetry, they are classics of our prose.
Page 267 - In the Spring a fuller crimson comes upon the robin's breast; In the Spring the wanton lapwing gets himself another crest; In the Spring a livelier iris changes on the burnished dove; In the Spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love.

Bibliographic information