Sacred Classics, Or, Cabinet Library of Divinity: Analogy of religion, natural and revealed

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Richard Cattermole, Henry Stebbing
J. Hatchard, 1834 - Christianity
 

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Page 225 - For the law having a shadow of good things to come, and not the very image of the things, can never with those sacrifices, which they offered year by year continually, make the comers thereunto perfect.
Page 228 - And every creature which is in heaven, and on the earth, and under the earth, and such as are in the sea, and all that are in them, heard I saying ; Blessing and honour and glory and power be unto him that sitteth upon the throne and unto the Lamb for ever and ever.
Page 206 - Unto whom it was revealed, that not unto themselves, but unto us they did minister the things, which are now reported unto you by them that have preached the gospel unto you with the Holy Ghost sent down from heaven ; which things the angels desire to look into.
Page 3 - It is come, I know not how, to be taken for granted, by many persons, that Christianity is not so much as a subject of inquiry ; but that it is, now at length, discovered to be fictitious. And, accordingly, they treat it as if, in the present age, this were an agreed point among all people of discernment ; and nothing remained but to set it up as a principal subject of mirth and ridicule, as it were by way of reprisals for its having so long interrupted the pleasures of the world.
Page 49 - How long, ye simple ones, will ye love simplicity, and the scorners delight in their scorning, and fools hate knowledge ? Turn ye at my reproof. Behold, I will pour out my Spirit upon you, I will make known my words unto you.
Page 226 - Wherefore when he cometh into the world, he saith, Sacrifice and offering thou wouldest not, but a body hast thou prepared me: in burnt offerings and sacrifices for sin thou hast had no pleasure. Then said I, Lo, I come (in the volume of the book it is written of me,) to do thy will, O God.
Page 172 - Moral precepts are precepts, the reasons of which we see: positive precepts are precepts, the reasons of which we do not see.* Moral duties arise out of the nature of the case itself, prior to external command. Positive duties do not arise out of the nature of the case, but from external command ; nor would they be duties at all, were it not for such command, received from him whose creatures and subjects we are.
Page 289 - It is a light thing that thou shouldest be my servant To raise up the tribes of Jacob, And to restore the preserved of Israel: I will also give thee for a light to the Gentiles, That thou mayest be my salvation unto the end of the earth.
Page 50 - Therefore shall they eat of the fruit of their own way, and be filled with their own devices.
Page 230 - How and in what particular way it had this efficacy, there are not wanting persons who have endeavoured to explain : but I do not find that the Scripture has explained it.

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