Remarks During a Journey Through North America in the Years 1819, 1820, and 1821: In a Series of Letters, with an Appendix Containing an Account of Several of the Indian Tribes and the Principal Missionary Stations, &c. ; Also, a Letter to M. Jean Baptiste Say, on the Comparative Expense of Free and Slave Labour

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Samuel Whiting, 1823 - Indians of North America - 335 pages
 

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Page 275 - Verily I say unto you ; There is no man that hath left house, or brethren, or sisters, or father, or mother, or wife, or children, or lands, for my sake, and the gospel's, but he shall receive an hundred-fold now in this time, houses, and brethren, and sisters, and mothers, and children, and lands, with persecutions, and in the world to come eternal life.
Page 235 - And they shall destroy the walls of Tyrus, and break down her towers: I will also scrape her dust from her, and make her like the top of a rock. It shall be a place for the spreading of nets in the midst of the sea: for I have spoken it, saith the Lord God: and it shall become a spoil to the nations.
Page 277 - And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be upon thy heart; and thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thy house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up.
Page 175 - a generous action: in so free and kind a manner did they contribute to " my relief, that if I was dry, I drank the sweetest draught; and if hungry, " I ate the coarsest morsel with a double relish.
Page 250 - Institutions, containing in substance all that ages had done for human government, were established in a forest. Cultivated mind was to act on uncultivated nature; and, more than all, a government and a country were to commence with the very first foundations laid under the divine light of the Christian religion.
Page 249 - ... and we look not to the question whether he himself have or have not children to be benefited by the education for which he pays. We regard it as a wise and liberal system of police, by which property and life and the peace of society are secured. We seek to prevent, in some measure, the extension of the penal code, by inspiring a salutary and conservative principle of virtue and of knowledge in an early age.
Page 248 - For the purpose of public instruction, we hold every man subject to taxation in proportion to his property, and we look not to the question whether he himself have or have not children to be benefited by the education for which he pays.
Page 289 - M. JEAN-BAPTISTE SAY, On the Comparative Expense of Free and Slave Labour.
Page 122 - No voice, well known through many a day, To speak the last, the parting word, Which, when all other sounds decay, Is still like distant music heard; — That tender farewell on the shore Of this rude world, when all is o'er, Which cheers the spirit, ere its bark Puts off into the unknown Dark.
Page 68 - Brief History of the progress and present state of the Unitarian Churches in America ;' compiled from documents and information communicated by the Rev. James Freeman, DD and William Wells, Jun.

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