The Poetical Works of John Skelton: With Notes, and Some Account of the Author and His Writings, Volume 2

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Page 339 - Ful wel she sange the service devine, Entuned in hire nose ful swetely; And Frenche she spake ful fayre and fetisly, After the scole of Stratford atte bowe, For Frenche of Paris was to hire unknowe.
Page 351 - Hall, as well noblemen and other worthy gentlemen, as 10 noblemen and gentlemen of his own family ; thus passing forth with two great crosses of silver borne before him ; with also two great pillars of silver, and his pursuivant at arms with a great mace of silver gilt.
Page 316 - Hic canit errantem lunam solisque labores, Unde hominum genus et pecudes, unde imber et ignes, Arcturum pluviasque Hyadas geminosque Triones, Quid tantum oceano properent se tinguere soles 745 Hiberni, vel quae tardis mora noctibus obstet.
Page 36 - Rynne away and crepe, Lyke a mayny of shepe; Dare nat loke out at dur For drede of the mastyue cur, For drede of the bochers dogge Wold wyrry them lyke an hogge. For and this curre do gnar, They must stande all a far, To holde vp their hande at the bar. For all their noble blode He pluckes them by the hode, And shakes them by the eare, And brynge [sj them in suche feare...
Page 352 - ... in crimson velvet, and gilt stirrups. When he was mounted, with his cross bearers, and pillar bearers, also upon great horses trapped with [fine] scarlet, then marched he forward, with his train and furniture in manner as I have declared, having about him four footmen, with gilt poll-axes in their hands ; and thus he went until he came to Westminster Hall door.
Page 225 - To come closer to the sence of this Proverb, I conceive it first of outlandish extraction, and cast by forraigners as a note of disgrace on all the English, though it chanceth to stick only on the Kentish at this Day.
Page 290 - ... all in red, in the habit of a cardinal; which was either of fine scarlet, or else of crimson s,atin, taffety, damask, or caffa, the best that he could get for money : and upon his head a round pillion, with a noble of black velvet set to the same in the inner side ; he had also a tippet of fine sables about his neck...
Page 138 - In our forefathers tyme, whan Papistrie, as a standyng poole, couered and ouerflowed all England, fewe bookes were read in our tong, sauyng certaine bookes of Cheualrie, as they sayd, for pastime and pleasure, which, as some say, were made in Monasteries, by idle Monkes or wanton Chanons: as 'one for example, Morte Arthure...
Page 145 - ... excita curis, sed videt ingratos intabescitque videndo successus hominum carpitque et carpitur una suppliciumque suum est. quamvis tarnen oderat illam, talibus adfata est breviter Tritonia dictis: "infice tabe tua natarum Cecropis unam. sie opus est. Aglauros ea est.
Page 138 - Syr Lamerocke, with the wife of king Lote, that was his own aunte. This is good stuffe, for wise men to laughe at, or honest men to take pleasure at. Yet I know, when Gods Bible was banished the Court, and Morte Arthure receiued into the Princes chamber.

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