Letters

Front Cover
Baldwin and Cradock, 1836

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents


Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 272 - I'll tell you, friend! a wise man and a fool. You'll find, if once the monarch acts the monk, Or, cobbler-like, the parson will be drunk, Worth makes the man, and want of it, the fellow; The rest is all but leather or prunella.
Page 38 - Gothic porch smothered with honeysuckles, their little gardens and high walls, their box-edgings, balls of holly, and yew-tree statues, are become so entirely unfashionable now, that we can hardly believe it possible, that a people who resembled us so little in their taste, should resemble us in any thing else.
Page 7 - Better for a man never to have seen them, or to see them with the eyes of a brute, stupid and unconscious of what he beholds, than not to be able to say, " The Maker of all these wonders is my friend...
Page 17 - LADY. SWEET stream, that winds through yonder glade, Apt emblem of a virtuous maid — Silent and chaste she steals along, Far from the world's gay busy throng ; • With gentle yet prevailing force, Intent upon her destined course ; Graceful and useful all she does, Blessing and blest where'er she goes.
Page 222 - I feel myself not a little influenced by a tender regard to my reputation here, even among my neighbours at Olney. Here are watch-makers, who themselves are wits, and who at present, perhaps, think me one. Here is a carpenter, and a baker ; and, not to mention others, here is your idol, Mr. , whose smile is fame. All these read the Monthly Review, and all these will set me down for a dunce, if those terrible critics should show them the example.
Page 111 - The news at Oney is little or noney ; but such as it is, I send it, viz. : Poor Mr. Peace cannot yet cease, addling his head with what you said, and has left parish-church quite in the lurch, having almost swore to go there no more.
Page 332 - ... me. My friends, I know, expect that I shall see yet again. They think it necessary to the existence of divine truth, that he who once had possession of it should never finally lose it. I admit the solidity of this reasoning in every case but my own. And why not in my own? For causes which to them it appears madness to allege, but which rest upon my mind with a weight of immovable conviction.
Page 37 - My good sir, a man has no right to do either." But it is to be hoped that the present century has nothing to do with the mouldy opinions of the last; and so, good Sir Launcelot, or...
Page 112 - to be sure, the gentleman's Muse wears Methodist shoes, you may know by her pace and talk about grace, that she and. her bard have little regard for the taste and fashions, and ruling passions, and...
Page 277 - But the beauties of the spot are themselves an interruption ; my attention is called upon by those very myrtles, by a double row of grass pinks just beginning to blossom, and by a bed of beans already in bloom ; and you are to consider it, if you please, as no small proof of my regard, that though you have so many powerful rivals, I disengage myself from them all, and devote this hour entirely to you.

Bibliographic information