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the Pope first strictly forbade the clergy to receive CHAP. investitures from laymen, or to do them homage. IV. A council held at Rome entirely condemned this A. D. practice; and the condemnation was the less un- 1108. popular, because the investiture gave rise to frequent and flagrant abuses, especially in England, where the sees were on this pretence with much scandal long held in the king's hands; and afterwards as scandalously and publickly sold to the highest bidder. So it had been in the last reign, and so it continued in this.

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Henry, though vigorously attacked, with great resolution maintained the rights of his crown with regard to investitures, whilst he saw the emperour, who claimed a right of investing the Pope himself,. subdued by the thunder of the Vatican. His chief opposition was within his own kingdom. Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury, a man of unblamable life and of learning for his time, but blindly attached to the rights of the Church, real or supposed, refused to consecrate those, who received investitures from the king. The parties appealed to Rome; Rome, willing either to recede from her pretensions, or to provoke a powerful monarch, gives a dubious answer. Meanwhile the contest grows hotter ; Anselm is obliged to quit the kingdom, but is still inflexible. At last the king, who from the delicate situation of his affairs in the beginning of his reign had been obliged to temporize for a long

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his family by splendid alliances. His daughter cHAT. Matilda he married to the emperour; but his pri- IV. vate fortunes did not flow with so even a course as A. D. his publick affairs. His only son William, with a 1120. natural daughter, and many of the flower of the young nobility, perished at sea between Normandy and England. From that fatal accident the king was never seen to smile. He sought in vain from a second marriage to provide a male successor; DELA but when he saw all prospect of this at an end, he GCLE called a great council of his barons and prelates. 1127. His daughter Matilda, after the decease of the

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emperour, he had given in marriage to Geoffrey Plantagenet, Count of Anjou. As she was his only remaining issue, he caused her to be acknow ledged as his successor by the great council; he enforced this acknowledgment by solemn oaths of fealty; a sanction, which he weakened, rather than confirmed, by frequent repetition; vainly imagining, that on his death any ties would bind to the respect of a succession, so little respected by himself, and by the violation of which he had procured his crown. Having taken these measures in favour of his daughter, he died in Normandy, but in a good old age, and in the thirty-sixth year of a prosperous reign, had botimilar as qalbnetko to bas оролья

helen) vins II Sekgooq et kas võisin quit tevo boold ni mud wou de atropij oud to nolomun ada ia bernoi bail od sub eshoped yd bared or has eldenteneqent

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