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And my shoulder stiff to the wheel I | In my fo'castle bunk, in a jacket lay,

dry, As I answer. “ Ay, ay, sir ! Ila-a-rd Eight bells have struck and my watch a lee! 's

is below.

WALTER MITCHEL. With the swerving leap of a startled

steed The ship flies fast in the eye of the SONG OF THE EMIGRANTS IN wind,

BERMUDA. The dangerous shoals on the lee recede,

WHERE the remote Bermudas ride And the headland white we have In the ocean's bosom unespied, left behind.

From a small boat that rowed along,

The listening winds received this The topsails flutter, the jibs collapse,

song:And belly and tug at the groaning “What should we do but sing His cleats;

praise, The spanker slats, and the mainsail That led us through the watery Maps;

maze And thunders the order, “ Tacks and Where He the huge sea-monsters sheets!"

wracks,

That lift the deep upon their backs, Mid the rattle of blocks and the Unto an isle so long iknown, tramp of the crew,

And yet far kinder than our own? Hisses the rain of the rushing squall: Ile lands us on a grassy stage, The sails are aback from clew to Safe from the storms, and prelate's clew,

rage: And now is the moment for, “Main Ile gave us this eternal spring sail, haul!"

Which here enamcls every thing,

And sends the fowls to us in care And the heavy yards, like a baby's On daily visits through the air. toy,

Ile hangs in shades the orange bright, By fifty strong arms are swiftly Like golden lamps in a green night, swung:

And does in the pomegranates close She holds her way, and I look with Jewels more rich than Ormus shows: joy

Ile makes the figs our mouths to For the first white spray o'er the bul

meet, warks flung.

And throws the melons at our feet;

But apples, plants of such a price, "Let go, and haul!" "Tis the last No trec could ever bear them twice. command,

With cedars chosen by his hand And the head-sails fill to the blast From Lebanon he stores the land; once more:

And makes the hollow seas that roar Astern anil to leeward lies the land, Proclaim the ambergris on shore. With its breakers white on the He cast (of which we rather boast) shingly shore.

The gospel's pearl upon our coast;

And in these rocks for us did frame What matters the reef, or the rain, A temple where to somd his name. or the squall?

Oh! let our voice his praise exalt I stearly the helm for the open sea; Till it arrive at heaven's vault, The first mate clamors, “Belay there, Which ten perhaps rebounding may all!"

Echo beyond the Mexique bay.". And the captain's breath once more Thus sung they in the English boat comes free.

A holy and a cheerful note:

And all the way, to guide their And so off shore let the good ship

chime, fly;

With falling oars they kept the time. Little care I how the gusts may blow,

A. MARVELL,

ÇAVE OF STAFFA. In symmetry, and fashioned to en

dure, THANKS for the lessons of this spot, Unhurt, the assaults of time with all fit school

his hours, For the presumptuous thoughts that | As the supreme Artificer ordained. would assign

WORDSWORTH. Mechanic laws to agency divine, And, measuring heaven by earth, would overrule

THE STORM. Infinite power. The pillared vestibule,

The sky is changed; and such Expanding yet precise, the roof em

a change! ( night, bowed,

And storm, and darkness, ye are Might seem designed to humble

wondrous strong, man, when proud

Yet lovely in your strength, as is Of his best workmanship by plan

the light and tool.

Of a dark eye in woman! Faralong, Down-bearing with his whole Atlan From peak to peak, the rattling tic weight

crags among, Of tide and tempest on the struc Leaps the live thunder! Not from ture's base,

one lone cloud, And flashing upwards to its topmost But every mountain now hath height,

found a tongue, Ocean has proved its strength, and And Jura answers, through her of its grace

misty shroud, In calms is conscious, finding for his Back to the joyous Alps, who call to freight

her aloud! Of softest music some responsive

BYRON. place. WORDSWORTII.

SUNSET.

FLOWERS ON THE TOP OF
TIS PILLARS AT THE EN-
TRANCE OF THE CAVE.

IIOPE smiled when your nativity

was cast, Children of summer! Ye fresh

flowers that brave What summer here escapes not, the

fierce wave, And whole artillery of the western

blast. Battering the temple's front, its

long-drawn nave Smiting, as if each moment were

their last. But ye, bright flowers, on frieze and

architrave Survive, and once again the pile

stands fast, Calm as the universe, from specular

towers Of heaven contemplated by spirits

pureSuns and their systems, diverse yet

sustained

The moon is up, and yet it is not

night: Sunset divides the sky with her;

a sea Of glory streams along the Alpine

height Of blue Friuli's mountains; heaven

is free From clouds, but of all colors

seems to be Melted to one vast Iris of the west, Where the day joins the past

eternity:
While, on the other hand, meek

Dian's crest
Floats through the azure air, an

island of the blest.

A single star is at her side, and

reigns With her o'er half the lovely

heaven; but still Yon sunny sea heaves brightly,

and remains Rolled o’er the peak of the far

Rhætian hill,

As day and night contending were / Like thy own brawling springs, until

Thy springs, and dying gales; Nature reclaimed her order: gently flows

O nymph reserved, while now the The deep-yed Brenta, where

bright-haired sun their hues instil

Sits in yon western tent, whose cloudy The odorous purple of a new-born

skirts, rose,

With brede ethereal wove, Which streams upon her stream, O’erhang his wavy bed: and glassed within it glows,

Now air is hush'd, save where the Filled with the face of heaven,

weak-eyed bat which, from afar,

With short shirill shriek flits by on Comes down upon the waters; all

leathern wing; its hues,

Or where the beetle winds From the rich sunset to the rising His small but sullen horn,

star, Their magical variety diffuse: As oft he rises ’midst the twilight And now they change; a paler

path, shadow strews

Against the pilgrim borne in heedless Its mantle o'er the mountains:

hum: parting day

Now teach me, maid composed, Dies like the dolphin, whom each To breathe some softened strain,

pang imbues With a new color as it gasps away, Whose numbers, stealing through thy The last still loveliest, till 'tis gone

darkening vale, - and all is gray.

May not unseemly with its stillness
BYRON.

suit;
As, musing slow, I hail

Thy genial loved return!
MOONLIGHT.

For when thy folding-star arising How sweet the moonlight sleeps

shows upon this bank!

His paly circlet, at his warning lamp Here will we sit, and let the sounds

The fragrant Ilouu's and Elves of music

Who slept in buds the day, Creep in your ears: soft stillness,

and the night, Become the touches of sweet har

And many a Nymph who wreathes

her brow's with sedye, monly.

And sheds the freshening dew, and, Sit, Jessica: look, how the floor of

lovelier still, heaven Is thick inlaid with patines of bright

The pensive Pleasures sweet,

Prepare thy shadowy car. gold: There's not the smallest orb which thou behold'st,

Then let me rove some wild and But in his motion like an angel sings,

healthy scene; Still quiring to the young-ey'd

Or find some ruin, 'midst its dreary cherubims.

dells,
SHAKSPEARE.

Whose walls more awful nod
By thy religious gleams.

ODE TO EVENING. Or, if chill blustering winds, or driv

ing rain, IF aught of oaten stop, or pastoral Prevent my willing feet, be mine the song,

hut, May hope, chaste Eve, to soothe thy That from the mountain's side, modest ear,

| Views wilds, and swelling floods,

And hamlets brown, and dim-dis- | Why do we then shun Death with covered spires;

anxious strife? And hears their simple bell, and If Light can thus deceive, wheremarks o'er all

fore not Life? Thy dewy fingers draw

J. BLANCO WHITE. The gradual dusky veil.

TO THE EVENING STAR.

While Spring shall pour his showers,

as oft he wont, And bathe thy breathing tresses,

meetest Eve! While Summer loves to sport Beneath thy lingering light;

While sallow Autumn fills thy lap

with leaves; Or Winter, yelling through the trou

blous air, Affrights thy shrinking train, And rudely rends thy robes;

SINCE the Sun, The absolute, the world-absorbing

... one, Relinquished half his empire to the

host Emboldened by thy guidance, holy

star, Holy as princely, wlo that looks on

three, Touching, as now, in thy humility The mountain borders of this seat

of care, Can question that thy countenance

i s bright, Celestial power, as much with love as light?

WORDSWORTH,

So long, regardful of the quiet

rule, Shall Fancy, Friendship, Science,

smiling Peace,
Thy gentlest influence own,
And love thy favorite name!

COLLINS.

NIGIIT AND DEATII. MYSTERIOUS Night! when our first

Parent knew
Thee, from report divine, and

heard thy name,
Did he not tremble for this lovely

Frame,
This glorious canopy of Light and

Blue?
Yet 'neath a curtain of translucent

dew, Bathed in the rays of the great set

ting Flame, IIesperiis with the IIost of Ileaven

came, And lo! Creation widened on Man's

view. Who could have thought such Dark

ness lay concealed Within thy beams, o Su! or who

could find, Whilst flower, and leaf, and insect

stood revealed, That to such countless Orbs thou

SONG OF THE STARS. When the radiant morn of creation

broke, And the world in the smile of God

awoke, And the empty realms of darkness

and death Were moved through their depthis

by his mighty breath, And orbs of beauty and spheres of

flame From the void abyss by myriads

came, In the joy of youth as they darted

away, Through the widening wastes of

space to play, Their silver voices in chorus rung, And this was the song the bright ones

sung. “ Away, away, through the wide,

wide sky, The fair blue fields that before us

lie, Each sun with the worlds that round

him roll, Each planet poised on her turning

mad'st us blind!

pole;

With her isles of green and lier | Glide on, in the glory and gladness clouds of white,

sent, And her waters that lie like fluid To the farthest wall of the firmalight.

ment,

The boundless visible smile of Ilim, “ For the Source of Glory uncovers To the veil of whose brow your lamps his face,

are dim." And the brightness o'erflows un

BRYANT. bounded space; And we drink, as we go, the luminous tides

TIIE MILKY WAY. In our ruddy air and our blooming sides :

“Lo,” quoth he, “cast up thine Lo, yonder the living splendors

eve, play;

See yonder, lo! the galaxie, Away, on our joyous path, away! The which men clepe the Milky Way,

For it is white; and some parfay * Look, look, through our glittering Callen it Watling streete, ranks afar,

That once was brent with the hete, In the infinite azure, star after star, 1 When the Sunne's sonne the rede, How they brighten and bloom as they That hight Phaeton, would lead swiftly pass!

Algate his father's cart, and gie. * How the verdure runs o'er each roll " The cart horses gan well aspie, ing mass!

That he could no governaunce, And the path of the gentle winds is And gan for to leape and pranince, seen,

And bear him up, and now down, Where the small waves dance, and Till he saw the Scorpiou, the young woods lean.

Which that in Heaven a signe is yet,

And for feré lost his wit " And see, where brighter day-beams Of that, and let the reynés gone pour,

Of his horses, and they anone How the rainbows hang in the sunny Soone up to mount, and downe deshower;

scend, And the morn and eve, with their Till both air and Earthé brend, pomp of hues,

Till Jupiter, lo! at the last Shift o'er the bright planets and shed Him slow, and fro the carté cast. their dews;

CHAUCER. And twixt them both, o'er the teeming ground,

HIOPE. With her shadowy cone the night goes round!

At summer eve, when heaven's aë

rial bow “ Away, away! in our blossoming Spaus with bright arch the glittering bowers,

hills below, In the soft air wrapping these spheres Why to yon mountain turns the of ours,

- musing eye, In the seas and fountains that shine Whose sunbright summit mingles with morn,

with the sky? See, love is brooding, and life is born, Why do those clitis of shadowy tint And breathing myriads are breaking

appear from night,

More sweet than all the landscape To rejoice like us, in motion and

smiling near ? light.

'Tis distance lends enchantment to

the view, “Glide on in your beauty, ye youth- And robes the mountain in its azure ful spheres,

hue. To weave the dance that measures

CAMPBELL. the years;

Guide.

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