Contributions to American history, 1858

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Lippincott, 1858
 

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Page 337 - Hence the common remark of his officers, of the advantage he derived from councils of war, where, hearing all suggestions, he selected whatever was best ; and certainly no general ever planned his battles more judiciously.
Page 24 - AN INCESSANT ATTENTION TO PRESERVE INVIOLATE THOSE EXALTED RIGHTS AND LIBERTIES OF HUMAN NATURE FOR WHICH THEY HAVE FOUGHT AND BLED AND WITHOUT WHICH THE HIGH RANK OF A RATIONAL BEING IS A CURSE INSTEAD OF A BLESSING. "AN UNALTERABLE DETERMINATION TO PROMOTE AND CHERISH, BETWEEN THE RESPECTIVE STATES THAT UNION AND NATIONAL HONOR SO ESSENTIALLY NECESSARY TO THEIR HAPPINESS AND THE FUTURE DIGNITY OF THE AMERICAN EMPIRE.
Page 178 - Know precisely what the insurgents aim at. If they have real grievances, redress them if possible; or acknowledge the justice of them, and your inability to do it at the present moment. If they have not, employ the force of government against them at once.
Page 246 - And lastly, that both Christians and Indians should acquaint their Children with this league and firm chain of friendship made between them, and...
Page 156 - The people of the territory of the United States south of the River Ohio...
Page 270 - ... of the sovereignties that constitute these imperial states shall refuse to submit their claim or pretensions to them, or to abide and perform the judgment thereof, and seek their remedy by arms, or delay their compliance beyond the time...
Page 233 - It is enacted by the authority aforesaid, that no person now, or at any time hereafter, living in this province, who shall confess and acknowledge one Almighty God to be the Creator, upholder and ruler of the world...
Page 327 - Sir Henry Clinton has been too good to me ; he has been lavish of his kindness ; I am bound to him by too many obligations, and love him too well to bear the thought that he should reproach himself, or...
Page 400 - Soon, however, recollecting himself, he added: "It will be but a momentary pang ;"and, springing upon the cart, performed the last offices to himself, with a composure that excited the admiration, and melted the hearts of the beholders.
Page 251 - Now this great God hath been pleased to make me concerned in your part of the world, and the king of the country where I live hath given...

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