A chronological abridgment of the history of Great Britain, from the first invasion of the Romans to the year 1763

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Page 481 - That the freedom of speech, and debates or proceedings in Parliament, ought not to be impeached or questioned in any court or place out of Parliament.
Page 481 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of parliament, is against law.
Page 21 - The King willeth that right be done according to the laws and customs of the realm ; and that the statutes be put in due execution, that his subjects may have no cause to complain of any wrong or oppressions, contrary to their just rights and liberties, to the preservation whereof he holds himself as well obliged as of his prerogative.
Page 511 - Will you to the utmost of your power maintain the laws of God, the true profession of the gospel and the protestant reformed religion established by law...
Page 474 - second, having endeavoured to subvert the constitution of " the kingdom, by breaking the original contract between " king and people — and, by the advice of Jesuits and other " wicked persons, having violated the fundamental laws, " and having withdrawn himself out of this kingdom — has " abdicated the government, and that the throne is thereby
Page 179 - Consider, it will soon carry you a great way; it will carry you from earth to heaven; and there you shall find, to your great joy, the prize to which you hasten, a crown of glory.
Page 9 - I pray you to consider what these new counsels are, and may be. I fear to declare those that I conceive. In all Christian kingdoms you know that parliaments were in use anciently, until the monarchs began to know their own strength ; and, seeing the turbulent spirit of their parliaments, at length they, by little and little, began to stand upon their prerogatives, and at last overthrew the parliaments throughout Christendom, except here only -with us.
Page 299 - It was also enacted, that all magistrates should disclaim the obligation of the covenant, and should declare both their belief that it was not lawful, upon any pretence whatsoever, to resist the king, and their abhorrence of the traitorous position of taking arms by the king's authority against his person, or against those who were commissioned by him.
Page 381 - Prosecutors, whether attorneys and solicitorsgeneral, or managers of impeachment, acted with the fury which in such circumstances might be expected ; juries partook, naturally enough, of the national ferment ; and judges, whose duty it was to guard them against such impressions, were scandalously active in confirming them in their prejudices and inflaming their passions.
Page 482 - And they do claim, demand and insist upon all and singular the premises, as their undoubted rights and liberties...

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