The New Ireland Review, Volume 10

Front Cover
New Ireland Review Office, 1899
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 71 - The heights by great men reached and kept, Were not attained by sudden flight, But they, while their companions slept, Were toiling upward in the night, Standing on what too long we bore With shoulders bent and downcast eyes, We may discern — unseen before — A path to higher destinies. Nor deem the irrevocable Past As wholly wasted — wholly vain — If rising on its wrecks, at last, To something nobler we attain.
Page 173 - The religion of the papists is superstitious and idolatrous; their faith and doctrine, erroneous and heretical, their church, in respect of both, apostatical. To give them therefore a toleration, or to consent that they may freely exercise their religion, and professe their faith and doctrine, is a grievous sinnc, and that in two respects.
Page 266 - ... be wrought in us by what is unsubstantial, and comes and goes, and begins and ends in itself? It is not so; it cannot be. No; they have escaped from some higher sphere; they are the outpourings of eternal harmony in the medium of created sound ; they are echoes from our Home ; they are the...
Page 307 - ... Charette and to the Count de Sombreuil— the death of a soldier, and to be shot by a file of grenadiers. This is the only favour I have to ask ; and I trust that men susceptible of the nice feelings of a soldier's honour will not refuse the request. It is not from any personal feeling that I make this request, but from a respect to the uniform which I wear, and to the brave army in which I have fought. From papers which I yesterday delivered into the hands of the...
Page 15 - My boyish ear still clung to hear Of Erin's pride of yore, Ere Norman foot had dared pollute Her independent shore : Of chiefs, long dead, who rose to head Some gallant patriot few, Till all my aim on earth became To strike one blow for you, Dear land — To strike one blow for you. What path is best your rights to wrest Let other heads divine ; By work or word, with voice or sword, To follow them be mine. The breast that zeal and hatred steel, No terrors can subdue ; If death should come, that martyrdom...
Page 141 - Many of you here have proved that they can be done without, for you are strong in health, and in the possession of all your faculties. After much reflection on the subject, I have come to the conviction that there is no necessity for them for any one in good health ; and I advise you all to follow my example.
Page 165 - A LAUGHTER in the diamond air, a music in the trembling grass ; And one by one the words of light as joydrops through my being pass : " I am the sunlight in the heart, the silver moon-glow in the mind ; My laughter runs and ripples through the wavy tresses of the wind. I am the fire upon the hills, the dancing flame that leads afar Each burning-hearted wanderer, and I the dear and homeward star. A myriad lovers died for me, and in their latest yielded breath I woke in glory giving them immortal life...
Page 224 - The sun's a good pimple, an honest soaker ; he has a cellar at your Antipodes. If I travel, aunt, I touch at your Antipodes. — Your Antipodes are a good, rascally sort of...
Page 20 - Teeling, since he came into your country. I dare to hope, sir, that he will pay attention to my letter, and that he will not leave you ignorant of the particulars of it. I proceed myself to put you in possession of them, well persuaded that you will regard them. Teeling, by his bravery and generous conduct, has prevented, in all the towns through which we have passed, the insurgents from proceeding to the most criminal excesses. Write to Killalla, to Ballina, to Castlebar, there does not live an...
Page 173 - ... in the courts of law, and to sue the livery of their lands out of the Court of Wards, on taking an oath of civil allegiance in lieu of the oath of supremacy;' that the undertakers in the several plantations should have time allowed them to fulfil the conditions of their leases ; that the claims of the crown should be confined to the last sixty years ; that the inhabitants of Connaught should be permitted to make a new enrolment of their estates ; and that a parliament should be holden to confirm...

Bibliographic information