An Introduction to Mensuration and Practical Geometry

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Kimber & Sharpless, 1842 - Measurement - 288 pages
 

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Page 113 - A sphere is a solid figure described by the revolution of a semicircle about its diameter, which remains unmoved.
Page 279 - The following table gives the contents of a pipe one inch in diameter, in weight and measure; which serves as a standard for pipes of other diameters, their contents being found by the following rule. Multiply the numbers in the following table against any height, by the square of the diameter of the pipe, and the product will be the number of cubic inches, avoirdupois ounces, and wine gallons of water, that the given pipe will contain. EXAMPLE. How many wine gallons of water is contained in a pipe...
Page 12 - ... When a straight line standing on another straight line, makes the adjacent angles equal to one another, each of the angles is called a right angle ; and the straight line which stands on the other is called a perpendicular to it. 11. An obtuse angle is that which is greater than a right angle. 12. An acute angle is that which is less than a right angle. 13. A term or boundary is the extremity of any thing.
Page 18 - In a right-angled triangle, the side opposite to the right angle, is called the hypothenuse ; and the other two sides are called the legs, and sometimes the base and perpendicular : thus, A, B is the base, B, C perpendicular, and A, C hypothenuse.
Page 19 - The circumference of every circle is supposed to be divided into 360 equal parts, called degrees ; each degree into 60 equal parts, called minutes ; and each minute into 60 equal parts, called seconds.
Page 254 - MECHANICAL POWERS are certain simple instruments employed in raising greater weights, or overcoming greater resistance than could be effected by the direct application of natural strength. They are usually accounted six in number; viz. the Lever, the Wheel and Axle, the Pulley, the Inclined Plane, the Wedge, and the Screw.
Page 50 - Multiply the half sum and the three remainders continually together, and the square root of the product will be the area...
Page 17 - Parallel straight lines are such as are in the same plane, and which being produced ever so far both ways, do not meet.
Page 90 - As the conjugate diameter is to the transverse, So is the square root of the difference of the squares of the ordinate and semi-conjugate, To the distance between the ordinate and centre.
Page 14 - A sector is any part of a circle bounded by an arc, and two radii drawn to its extremities. A quadrant, or quarter of a circle...

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