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33. RED MAGNUM BONUM. Miller, No. 10.
Imperiall. Parkinson, No.9.
Imperial. Langley, p. 92. t. 20. fig. 5.
Imperiale Violette. Duhamel, No. 32. t. 15.

Branches smooth. Fruit pretty large, oval, about two inches and a quarter long, and one inch and three quarters in diameter, swelled much more on one side of the suture than on the other.. Stalk one inch and a quarter long, slender. Skin pale green on the shaded side, but of a deep red colour, with numerous grey specks, where fully exposed to the sun, and covered with a very thin blue bloom. Flesh yellowish green, and separates from the stone. Juice harsh, subacid. Stone oval, sharp-pointed.

Ripe the beginning and middle of September.

It ripened at Twickenham in 1727, on a north-west wall, July 15. O. S., or July 26. N. S. Langley.

An old Plum of our gardens, cultivated by John Tradescant, previously to 1629. A very hardy bearer as an open standard.

34. RED PERDRIGON. Forsyth, Ed. 7. No. 10. Perdrigon Rouge. Duhamel, No. 22. t. 20. f. 6.

Branches downy. Fruit middle-sized, of a roundish oval figure, about one inch and a quarter long, and nearly the same in diameter. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, inserted in a small round hollow. Skin of a fine red inclining to violet, sprinkled with small brownish yellow specks, and covered with a thick bloom. Flesh bright yellow, or greenish yellow, firm, sweet, and juicy, and separates from the stone.

Ripe the beginning and middle of September. 35. Royal Dauphin. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 238.

Branches smooth. Fruit large, oval, about six inches in circumference, somewhat broader at the apex than at the base. Stalk an inch long, stout. Skin of a pale red on the shaded side, marked with green specks, but of a darker red next the sun, mottled with darker and lighter shades, and covered with a violet bloom. Flesh greenish yellow, and separates from the stone, which is large. Juice sweet, mixed with a little sub

acid.

INICIOUS

Ripe the beginning of September.

36. ROYALE DE Tours. Duhamel, No. 17. t. 20. f. 8.

Fruit above the middle sizė, of a roundish figure, with a well marked suture extending from the base to the apex, and somewhat more swelled on one of its sides than on the other; about one inch and a half long, and nearly the same in diameter. Stalk half an inch long, slightly inserted. Skin bright red on the shaded side, but when fully exposed to the sun of a deep violet, sprinkled over with numerous small yellow spots, and covered with a thick bloom. Flesh greenish yellow. Juice plentiful and high flavoured.

Ripe the beginning and middle of August.
37. Violet DAMASK. Nursery Catalogue.
Damas Violet. Duhamel, No.5. t. 2.

Branches downy. Fruit small, of an oblong figure, somewhat larger at the apex than at the base, about one inch and a quarter long, and little more than an inch in diameter. Stalk half an inch long. Skin of a purplish violet colour, covered with a thin bloom. Flesh yellow, firm, and separates from the stone, leaving a few slightly attached pieces of the pulp behind. Juice very sweet, with a smart and pleasant flavour.

Ripe the middle and end of August.
38. VIOLET DIAPER. Nursery Catalogue.
Diaprée Violette. Duhamel, No. 36. t. 17.

Branches downy. Fruit below the middle size, of an oval figure, about one inch and a half long, and one inch and quarter in diameter, having a rather deep suture, on one side of which it is swelled considerably more than on the other. Stalk short, slender, rather deeply inserted. Skin thin, of a purplish red, covered with a thick bloom. Flesh yellowish, firm, and separates from the stone. Juice saccharine, plentiful, of an agreeable flavour. Stone narrow, with a long sharp point.

Ripe the beginning and middle of August.

This is a fleshy firm Plum, very good in the dessert, and excellent when dried as a Prune.

39. VIOLET PERDRIGON. Miller, No. 8. Perdrigon Violet. Duhamel, No. 21. t. 9.

Branches downy. Fruit middle-sized, a little more long than broad, and enlarged a little at the apex, about one inch and a half long, and nearly as much in diameter. Stalk half an inch long, curved, slender. Skin of a dull greenish brown, full of small brown specks, and covered with a thick pale bloom. Flesh greenish yellow, pretty firm, and adheres to the stone. Juice sweet, and of a very excellent flavour.

Ripe the end of August and beginning of September.
40. Wheat Plum. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 271.
Wheaten. Ray, No. 17.
Whitton. Hort. Soc. Cat. 271.
Nutmeg. Parkinson, No. 18.

Branches numerous, slender, smooth. Fruit small, somewhat oblong, about one inch and one eighth long, and an inch in diameter, mostly growing in pairs, a little swelled on one side of the suture more than on the other, which is shallow. Stalk five eighths of an inch long, inserted in a small narrow cavity. Skin pale amber on the shaded side, but of a bright red, marbled with a deeper colour, where exposed to the sun, and covered with a thin white bloom. Flesh greenish yellow, rather firm, and adheres to the stone. Juice sugary, with a little subacid.

Ripe the middle of August.

This is called Wheat Plum, in consequence of its being ripe about the time of the wheat harvest.

41. Wilmot's EARLY ORLEANS. Hort. Trans. Vol. iii. p. 392. t. 14.

Wilmot's Orleans. Hort. Soc. Cat. No. 274.
Wilmot's New Early Orleans. Ib.

Wilmot's Late Orleans. Ib. According to the Hort. Soc. Cat.

Branches downy, like the Common Orleans. Fruit above the middle size, round, rather deeply cleft, more compressed than the Old Orleans, especially at the apex. Stalk short. Skin pale red on the shaded side, but where exposed to the sun of a dark purple tint, and covered with a fine thin bloom. Flesh of a rich greenish yellow, inclining to amber when quite ripe, of a pleasant consistence, being much softer and more juicy than the Orleans, and separates clean from the stone. Juice plentiful, sweet, combined with acid, of excellent flavour. Stone round, rather small, in proportion to the size of the fruit.

Ripe the beginning of August, as early as the Morocco, or the Precoce de Tours.

Raised in 1809 by Mr. John Wilmot, in his garden at Isleworth, near London.

42. WINESOUR. Forsyth, Ed.7. No. 32. Rotherham. Of the Old Gardens.

Branches slender, downy. Fruit rather larger than a Damson, oblong. Stalk half an inch long. Skin dark bluish purple, covered with dark purple specks, particularly where exposed to the sun. Flesh greenish yellow, and adheres to the stone, near which there are some red streaks in the flesh. Juice subacid. Stone long, slender, and acute-pointed.

Ripe about the middle of September.

This Plum is said to have originated in the neigh, bourhood of Rotherham, in Yorkshire, many years ago.

ong, slender Caks in the flestone, near w

The Winesour is the most valuable of all our Plums for preserving, and great quantities of it in this state are sent annually from Wakefield and Leeds to distant parts of England. As a preserve, they will keep one or two years, and are preferable to those imported from abroad.

Sect. IV. - White or Yellow fruited.

43. APRICOT. Switzer, p. 105. Miller, No. 13. Abricotée. Duhamel, No. 28. t. 13. Abricotée de Tours. Ib. t. 13.

Branches covered with a whitish down. Fruit pretty large, of a roundish figure, divided by a deep suture, about one inch and a half deep, and one inch and three quarters in diameter. Stalk short, scarcely more than a quarter of an inch long. Skin yellow, tinged with red on the sunny side, and covered with a white bloom. Flesh yellow, firm, but melting, and separates clean from the stone. Juice sweet, of a very excellent flavour.

Ripe the beginning and middle of September.

This very fine Plum is considered by Duhamel as nearly equal to the Green Gage: as it is too tender for an open standard, it is better to plant it against an east or south-east wall.

44. BRIGNOLE. Miller, No. 24.
Brignole Jaune. Knoop. Fruit. p. 55.
Prune de Brignole. Bon Jard. 1827. p. 290.

Fruit large, oval. Skin pale yellow, mixed with red
on the sunny side. Flesh pale yellow, rather dry.
Juice saccharine, of excellent flavour.
Ripe the middle and end of August.

This Plum is so named, from Brignole, a town of France, famous for its Prunes, of which this ranks among its best sorts.

45. COE's Plum. Pom. Mag. t. 57. Coe's Golden Drop. Ib.

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