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Belle Gabrielle. Ib.
Trompe Valet. Ib.

Fruit middle-sized, of a roundish figure, but rather larger at the crown than at the stalk ; about two inches and a half or two inches and three quarters deep, and the same in diameter. Eye small, with an open, reflexed, flat calyx, placed in a very shallow impression. Stulk three quarters of an inch long, stout, inserted in a very small cavity. Skin of a russet colour. Flesh melting, with a sugary musky juice.

In eating from November till January.

This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince ; but it is more productive upon the latter stock.

109. BERGAMOTTE DE SOULERS. Duhamel, No.51. t. 44. f. 1.

Bonne de Soulers. Ib.

Fruit rather large, of a roundish turbinate figure; about two inches and three quarters long, and the same in diameter, broadest in the middle, and narrowed to each extremity. Eye small, within a shallow basin. Stalk an inch long, strong, curved, and inserted in an oblique cavity. Skin smooth, of a greenish white, full of green specks, but of a brownish red on the sunny side. Flesh buttery and melting, with a sweet agreeable juice.

In eating in January and through March.
This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince.
110. Easter BERGAMOT. Miller, No. 69.
Bergamotte Bugi. Ib.
Bergamotte de Pâques. Duhamel, 52. t. 24.
Bergamotte d'Hiver. Ib.
La Grillière. Knoop. Pom. p. 134.
Paddington.
Tarling

Of some Nurseries.
Terling.
Winter Bergamot. J

Fruit pretty large, of a roundish turbinate figure ; three inches or more deep, and the same in diameter, but broadest at the crown. Eye small, closed, and sunk in a shallow basin. Stalk short, thick, inserted a little obliquely in a small shallow cavity. Skin green, quite round, and covered with numerous grey specks; but when matured it turns of a yellowish grey. Flesh white, half buttery, with a sugary, well-flavoured juice.

In eating from January till April or May.
This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince.

The Easter Bergamot has been a long time in this country, having been planted at Hampton Court in the time of Queen Elizabeth. It requires a south or southeast wall, and a dry bottom; on colder aspects it never ripens perfectly. The Brocas Bergamot of M. Parmentier's list, in Hort. Trans. vol. v, is undoubtedly this Pear.

111. FRANCREAL. Miller, No. 68.
Franc-réal. Duhamel, No. 60.
Fin or d'Hiver. Ib.

Fruit pretty large, of a somewhat globular figure, a little compressed at both extremities; about three inches and a half long, and nearly the same in diameter. Eye small, placed in a shallow narrow basin. Stalk three quarters of an inch long. Skin yellow, very much mottled with a pale russetty brown, particularly on the sunny side. Flesh rather dry, and apt to be gritty. Juice rather insipid, but is excellent when stewed.

In use from January till March.
This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince.
112. GERMAN Muscat. Miller, No.70.
Muscat d'Allemagne. Duhamel, No.72. t. 36.

Fruit pretty large, broadly turbinate, and somewhat compressed towards the stalk, about three inches deep, and the same in diameter. Eye small, seated in a small shallow basin. Stalk one inch and a half long, slender,

inserted in a very small cavity. Skin covered with russet quite round, and coloured with brown on the sunny side. Flesh pale yellow, buttery, and melting. Juice sugary, musky, and perfumed.

In eating from March till May.
This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince.
113. Gilogil. Pom. Mag. t. 65.
Gile-Ô-gile. Noisette Manuel Complet. p. 531.
Gros Gobet. 1 Of some French Gardens, according
Dagobert. S to the Pom. Mag.

Fruit large, somewhat obovate, flattened at the top, and tapering but little to the stalk, about three inches and a quarter deep, and three inches and a half in diameter. Eye large, and deeply sunk in a plaited radiated hollow. Stalk an inch long, rather deeply inserted in an uneven and mostly two-lipped cavity. Skin a deep close russet, rather deeply tinged with a brownish red on the sunny side. Flesh white, juicy, breaking, a little gritty, sweet, and pleasant.

In use from December till March or April.

A valuable winter Pear, although not of first-rate excellence. It is very handsome, and an excellent bearer. It will succeed as an open standard in a sheltered warm situation. Fine specimens are thus produced in the Horticultural Garden at Chiswick; but it is better, perhaps, to grow it against an east or south-east wall.

114. HOLLAND BERGAMOT. Miller, No.71.
Bergamotte d'Hollande. Duhamel, No. 53. t. 25.
Bergamotte d’Alençon. Ib.
Amoselle. Ib.
Lord Cheney's. Of some Gardens.

Fruit large, of a regular roundish figure, but somewhat broadest at the crown, about three inches deep, and nearly the same in diameter. Eye small, divested of its calyx, sunk pretty deep in a depressed and wide basin. Stalk one inch and a half long, slender, crooked, inserted in a slightly angular, but not deep cavity. Skin in the autumn green, marbled all over, more or less, with a thin brown russet; but as it acquires maturity, the skin becomes yellow, and the russetty colouring of a more lively character. Flesh half buttery, with a plentiful and highly flavoured juice.

In eating from March till May or June.
It succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince.

This very valuable Pear, if ever in the possession of Lord Cheney, must have been in this country previously to 1595. It originated at Alençon in France, and is highly deserving of cultivation. Its late period of ripening requires it should be planted against a south or south-east wall, in order to have it in the greatest perfection.

115. POIRE DU JARDIN. Duhamel, 28. t. 19. f. 3.

Fruit pretty large, round, and flattened somewhat like a Bergamot, about two inches and three quarters deep, and two inches and a half in diameter. Eye small, placed in a very shallow depression. Stalk three quarters of an inch long, stout, inserted in a small cavity.

Skin yellow on the shaded side, but of a soft red where exposed to the sun, and marked with a few yellow specks. Flesh half buttery, with an excellent saccharine juice.

In eating in December and January. "116. WINTER ORANGE. Hort. Trans. Vol.v. p. 139. t. 2. f. 3.

Orange d'Hiver. Duhamel, No. 29. t. 19. f. 4.

Fruit middle-sized, globular, a little flattened at the crown, about two inches and a quarter deep, and two inches and a half in diameter. Eye small, open, placed in a very shallow, perfectly round basin. Stalk an inch long, thick, and inserted in a small oblique cavity. Skin smooth, rich, yellow, covered with numerous brown

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specks. Flesh white, crisp, with a sugary, highly flavoured, musky juice.

In eating in February, and will keep till April.
This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince.

Sect. VI. - Winter Conical-fruited.

117. ANGÉLIQUE DE BORDEAUX. Duhamel, No.88. t. 47. f.5.

Poire Angélique. Miller, No.77.
Saint Martial. Ib.
Saint Marcel. Bon Jard. 1827, p. 311.
Gros Franc-réal. Ib.

Fruit pretty large, of a pyramidal turbinate figure, somewhat like a Bon-chrétien, about three inches and a quarter long, and two inches and three quarters in diameter. Eye small, placed in a narrow and rather deep hollow. Stalk one inch and a half long, strong, crooked, inserted in an oblique but not deep cavity. Skin smooth and yellowish, but on the sunny side it is of a faint purple colour. Flesh tender and buttery, with a sugary juice.

In eating from February till April.

It succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince, but not so well on the latter stock.

This Pear was introduced into this country about the year 1700, and first planted by the Duke of Montague at Ditton; it requires to be grown against a south or south-east wall.

118. ANGÉLIQUE DE ROME. Duhamel, No. 108. Jard. Fruit. t. 42.

Fruit middle-sized, a little more long than broad, being about two inches and a half long, and two inches and a quarter in diameter. Eye very small, placed in a narrow shallow basin. Stalkthree quarters of an inch long, inserted in a very small cavity. Skin rough, pale yellow

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