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Ripe the beginning and middle of August.
This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince.

The Red Muscadel generally produces a second crop of fruit, which ripens about the middle or end of September, but they are not so good as the former. It is a handsome upright growing tree, and a very excellent bearer.

31. Roi d'E'TÉ. Duhamel, No. 34. t. 12. Gros Rousselet. Ib. . Fruit middle-sized, of a pyramidal turbinate figure, about three inches long, and two inches and a quarter broad. Eye small, open, placed on a nearly flat crown. Stalk one inch and three quarters long, slender, but considerably thickened next the fruit, where it is inserted in a small regular cavity. Skin rough, of a pale green, but on the sunny side of a dull red, covered all over with numerous grey russetty specks. Flesh half buttery, and melting, with a very agreeable sugary subacid juice.

Ripe the end of August and beginning of September.
This succeeds on both the Pear and the Quince.
32. ROUSSELET DE RHEims. Duhamel, No. 32. t. 11.
Petit Rousselet. Jard. Fruit. t. 31.

Fruit small, of a pyramidal figure, about the size and shape of the Rousselet d'Hiver, but more tapering to the stalk; two inches and a quarter long, and one inch and three quarters in diameter. Eye small, open, placed on a flat, somewhat depressed apex. Stalk an inch long, thick, inserted without any cavity. Skin greenish grey, becoming yellow as it ripens, with numerous dark russetty specks, and some dark colouring on the side exposed to the sun. Flesh half buttery, and melting, with a very high flavoured musky juice.

Ripe the end of August and beginning of September.

This succeeds very well on both the Pear and the Quince.

33. SABINE D’E'TÉ. Hort. Trans. Vol. 4. p. 275.

Fruit of a pyramidal form, broadest at the crown, and tapering to a round blunt point at the stalk. Eye small, not deeply sunk. Stalk an inch long, inserted in a shallow. cavity. Skin perfectly smooth and even, of a yellow colour on the shaded side, and of a fine scarlet, minutely dotted when exposed to the sun. Flesh white, or nearly so, melting, juicy, and highly perfumed.

Ripe the beginning and middle of August.

Raised, in 1819, by M. Stoffels of Mechlin, and named by him after Mr. Sabine, at that time Secretary to the Horticultural Society of London.

34. SEIGNEUR D’EʼTÉ. Hort. Trans. Vol. iv. p. 276.

Fruit above the middle size, of a blunt oval figure. Skin of a fine orange, with bright scarlet on the sunny side, sprinkled with small brown spots, and partially marked with larger ones of the same colour. Flesh melting, with an extremely small cone, and a rich high flavoured juice. : Ripe the beginning and middle of September.

This very beautiful Pear has been known in Flanders many years, fruit of which were sent to this country by M. Stoffels of Mechlin, and exhibited at the Horticultural Society, in 1819.

35. Skinless Pear. Miller, No. 13. Poire sans Peau. Duhamel, No. 35. t. 13. Fleur de Guignes. Ib.

Fruit below the middle size, of a somewhat pyramidal figure, about two inches and a half long, and one inch and three quarters in diameter. Eye small, nearly closed, slightly depressed. Stalk one inch and a half long, slender, rather crooked, inserted in a small cavity. Skin extremely thin, smooth, pale green, with a few grey specks; on the sunny side yellow, marbled with light red. Flesh melting, with a most excellent sweet and perfumed juice.

Ripe the beginning and middle of August.

This grows strong on the Pear, but middling on the Quince.

36. SUMMER BONCHRÉTIEN. Miller, No. 24. Pom. Mag. t. 14.

Bonchrétien d'E'té. Duhamel, 90. t. 47. f. 4.
Gracioli. Ib. according to the Pom. Mag.
Die Sommer Christbirne. Pom. Aust. Vol. i. p. 38.

Fruit large, irregularly pyramidal, about four inches long, and three inches in diameter, exceedingly knobby and irregular in its outline, particularly about the eye. Eye small, prominent, in a narrow, shallow, obtuseangled basin. Stalk two inches and a half long, irregular and crooked, very obliquely inserted, in a knobby, irregular cavity. Skin, when fully ripe, of a pale lemon colour, very slightly tinged with red on the sunny side, and covered all over with small green dots. Flesh yellowish, breaking, firm, juicy, very sweet and excellent. Cone very small, placed near the eye. Ripe the middle of September.

This will take on both Pear and Quince, but should never be grafted on the latter stock.

A very excellent old Pear, mentioned by Parkinson, and by many modern Pomologists in France, Italy, Holland, and Germany, under various other names, not necessary to quote here as synonymes.

It succeeds best in this country on an east or west wall, being rather too tender for an open standard..

37. SUMMER FRANCRÉAL. Pom. Mag. t. 106. Francréal d’E'té. Diels, Pom.

Vol. iii. p. 245. Fondante, Knoop Pom. 93. t. 3. according to the France Canneel, Ib.

Pom. Mag. Gros Micet d’E'té. Of some

French Gardens, Fruit rather large, turbinate, thickest about two-thirds

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from the stalk, diminishing a little to the eye, about three inches and a quarter long, and three inches in diameter. Eye connivent, moderately depressed. Stalk short and thick. Skin green, nearly smooth, becoming pale yellowish-green, after the fruit has been gathered some time, and is fit for table. Flesh white, firm, juicy, becoming buttery and melting, rich and excellent.

Ripe the middle of September.

A very hardy tree, and a great bearer as an open standard.

38. Williams's BonchRÉTIEN. Hort. Trans. Vol. ii. p. 250. t. 16.

Fruit pretty large, of an irregular, pyramidal, and somewhat truncated form, from three to four inches long, and from two to three inches in diameter. Eye seated on the summit, and never in a hollow or cavity, as in other varieties called Bonchrétien. Stalk an inch long, very gross and fleshy. Skin pale green, mottled all over with a mixture of darker green and russet brown, becoming yellowish and tinged with red on the sunny side when fully ripe. Flesh whitish, very tender and delicate, abounding with a sweet and agreeably perfumed juice.

Ripe the end of August to the middle of September.

This Pear appears to have sprung up from seed in the garden of Mr. Wheeler, a schoolmaster at Aldermaston, in Berkshire, previously to 1770, as it was then a very young plant. An account of it was published by the Horticultural Society, as above, in 1816, at which time the garden in which the tree grew was in the possession of Wm. Congreve, Esq.

39. WINDSOR. Of all English Gardens.

Fruit middle-sized, oblong, obovate, not either pyramidal or turbinate, being widest above its middle, tapering to the crown, and suddenly contracted towards the stalk, where it is slender ; about three inches and a half

long, and two inches and a quarter in diameter. Eye small, with a connivent calyx, prominently placed on the summit. Stalk an inch long, slender, convexly inserted without any cavity. Skin yellowish green, full of small green specks, becoming yellow when fully ripe, and tinged with orange on the sunny side. Flesh white, soft, with a little grit at the core, and a sugary astringent juice.

Ripe the end of August and beginning of September.

I have not quoted any synonymes of this Pear from foreign authors, not being able to satisfy myself of their identity with it. DUHAMEL's figure of Cuisse Madame is pyramidally turbinate, evidently a different fruit.

The wood of the Windsor Pear is very stout, never producing laterals, perfectly erect, so much so as to be readily distinguished in the nursery from every other sort. The tree is by no means a hardy one, being very liable to canker, especially when planted either on gravelly or cold wet soils.

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40. YAT. l of the Dutch Gardens.

Fruit rather small, turbinate, about two inches long, and one inch and three quarters in diameter, generally a little flattened on the opposite sides. Eye small, opens with a very short calyx, seated in a rather shallow uneven basin. Stalk an inch long, rather slender, obliquely inserted, without any cavity. Skin of a very thick russetty brown, thickly covered with round grey specks, and generally a little coloured when exposed to the sun. Flesh breaking and tender, with a very sugary, rich, and highly perfumed juice.

Ripe the middle and end of September.

The trees of this very valuable variety grow large, and the branches are drooping like those of the Jargonelle, but much more slender and numerous. A very hardy bearer, brought from Holland by the late Thomas

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