Ireland and Her Churches

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Chapman and Hall, 1867 - Catholic Church - 623 pages
 

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Page 271 - Fair laughs the morn, and soft the zephyr blows While proudly riding o'er the azure realm In gallant trim the gilded vessel goes; Youth on the prow, and pleasure at the helm; Regardless of the sweeping whirlwind's sway, That, hush'd in grim repose, expects his evening prey.
Page 221 - Thou shalt rise up before the hoary head, and honour the face of the old man, and fear thy God: I am the LORD.
Page 437 - The first Sunday after the Epiphany. The Collect. OLord, we beseech thee mercifully to receive the prayers of thy people which call upon thee; and grant that they may both perceive and know what things they ought to do, and also may have grace and power faithfully to fulfil the same ; through Jesus Christ our Lord.
Page xvii - I believe, towards the close of the last century, and the beginning of the present, sent out more living writers, in its proportion, than any other school.
Page 152 - House resolves itself into a committee of the whole House, in order to consider the present state of the Church Establishment in Ireland, with the view of applying any surplus of the revenues not required for the spiritual care of its members to the general education of all classes of the people, without distinction of religious persuasion.'] 1835] THE IRISH CHURCH QUESTION.
Page 60 - From Scotland came many, and from England not a few, yet all of them generally the scum of both nations, who from debt, or breaking or fleeing from justice, or seeking shelter, came hither, hoping to be without fear of man's justice, in a land where there was nothing, or but little as yet, of the fear of God.
Page 17 - For there is no nation of people under the sun that doth love equal and indifferent justice better than the Irish, or will rest better satisfied with the execution thereof, although it be against themselves ; so as they may have the protection and benefit of the law when upon just cause they do desire it.
Page 26 - Nothing is clearer than that Patrick engrafted Christianity on the Pagan superstitions with so much skill, that he won the people over to the Christian religion before they understood the exact difference between the two systems of belief; and much of this half-Pagan half-Christian religion will be found, not only in the Irish stories of the middle ages, but in the superstitions of the peasantry of the present day.
Page 11 - Let no person wonder then, if we endeavour to preserve our lives and defend our liberties as well as we can, against those cruel tyrants, usurpers of our just properties, and murderers of our persons; so far from thinking it unlawful, we hold it to be a meritorious act, nor can we be accused of perjury or rebellion, since neither our fathers nor we did at any time bind ourselves by any oath of allegiance to their fathers or to them...

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