Memoirs of George Selwyn and his contemporaries

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Page 132 - For even then, sir, even before this splendid orb was entirely set, and while the western horizon was in a blaze with his descending glory, on the opposite quarter of the heavens arose another luminary, and, for his hour, became lord of the ascendant.
Page 238 - She is two women, the upper and the lower. I need not tell you that the lower is gallant, and still has pretensions. The upper is very sensible, too, and has a measured eloquence that is just and pleasing, — but all is spoiled by an unrelaxed attention to applause. You would think she was always sitting for her picture to her biographer.
Page 230 - Villiers lies— alas ! how changed from him, That life of pleasure, and that soul of whim ! Gallant and gay, in Cliveden's proud alcove, The bower of wanton Shrewsbury and love ; Or just as gay at council, in a ring Of mimic statesmen and their merry King.
Page 219 - Now Hervey, fair of face, I mark full well, With thee, Youth's youngest daughter, sweet Lepell.
Page 55 - Imbrown'd with native bronze, lo ! Henley stands. Tuning his voice, and balancing his hands. How fluent nonsense trickles from his tongue. How sweet the periods, neither said nor sung ! 3o6 H Still break the benches, Henley ! with thy strain, While Sherlock, Hare, and Gibson preach in vain.
Page 190 - And mariners, though shipwreck'd, dread to land. Here reign the blustering North and blighting East, No tree is heard to whisper, bird to sing ; Yet Nature could not furnish out the feast, Art he invokes new horrors still to bring. Here mouldering fanes and battlements arise, Turrets and arches nodding to their fall, Unpeopled monast'ries delude our eyes, And mimic desolation covers all.
Page 132 - In truth, sir, he was the delight and ornament of this house, and the charm of every private society which he honoured with his presence. Perhaps there never arose in this country, nor in any country, a man of a more pointed and finished wit ; and (where his passions were not concerned) of a more refined, exquisite...
Page 315 - So far was very well. On Saturday at the Maccaroni Club' (which is composed of all the travelled young men who wear long curls and spying-glasses,) they played again: the Due lost, but not much.
Page 171 - However, two nights afterwards, being left alone with her, while her mother and sister were at Bedford House, he found himself so impatient that he sent for a parson. The doctor refused to perform the ceremony without licence...
Page 118 - ... which he took off and put on a night-cap of Scotch plaid, and then pulled off his coat and waistcoat and lay down ; but being told he was on the wrong side, vaulted round, and immediately gave the sign by tossing up his arm, as if he were giving the signal for battle. He received three blows, but the first certainly took away all sensation. He was not a quarter of an hour on the scaffold ; Lord Kilmarnock above half a one. Balmerino certainly died with the intrepidity of a hero, but with the...

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