Our New England Family Recipes

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National Society New England Women, 1910 - Baking - 134 pages
 

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Page 5 - It means the knowledge of all herbs, and fruits, and balms, and spices; and of all that is healing and sweet in fields and groves, and savory in meats; it means carefulness, and inventiveness, and watchfulness, and willingness, and readiness of appliance; it means the economy of your greatgrandmothers, and the science of modern chemists ; it means much tasting, and no wasting; it means English thoroughness, and French art, and Arabian hospitality...
Page 5 - ... carefulness, and inventiveness, and watchfulness, and willingness, and readiness of appliance ; it means the economy of your greatgrandmothers, and the science of modern chemists ; it means much tasting, and no wasting ; it means English thoroughness, and French art, and Arabian hospitality ; and it means, in fine, that you are to be perfectly and always, * ladies...
Page 127 - Pease) Porridge Hot Pease porridge hot, pease porridge cold, Pease porridge in the pot nine days old ; Some like it hot, some like it cold, Some like it in the pot nine days old.
Page 5 - ... great-grandmothers, and the science of modern chemists; it means much tasting, and no wasting, it means English thoroughness, and French art, and Arabian hospitality, and it means, in fine, that you are to be perfectly and always "ladies" — "loaf-givers;" and, as you are to see, imperatively, that everybody has something pretty to put on, — so you are to see, yet more imperatively, that everybody has something nice to eat.
Page 121 - To make a perfect salad, there should be a spendthrift for oil, a miser for vinegar, a wise man for salt, and a madcap to stir the ingredients up, and mix them well together.
Page 128 - ... the chowder; fry out the pork very gently, and when the scraps are a good brown, take them out and put in the chopped onions to fry; they should be fried in a frying-pan, and the chowder-kettle be made very clean before they are put in it, or the chowder will burn. (The chief secret in chowder-making is to fry the onions so delicately that they will be missing in the chowder.) Add a quart of hot water to the onions; put in the clams, clam- water and pork scraps. After it boils, add the potatoes,...
Page 34 - We may live without conscience, and live without heart; We may live without friends, we may live without books, But civilized man cannot live without cooks ! He may live without books — what is knowledge but grieving ? He may live without hope — what is hope but deceiving?
Page 47 - ... spices to taste (I Kings 10: 10). Follow Solomon's advice for making good boys, and you will have a good cake.
Page 77 - Soak the gelatine in cold water till soft. Chill and whip the cream till you have three pints of the whip. Boil the remainder of the cream (or if it be all whipped, use a cup of milk) with the sugar ; and when boiling add the soaked gelatine. Stir till dissolved. Strain into a granite pan, add the vanilla or lemon, and wine if you wish ; or flavor with two...
Page 39 - Two eggs, cup cream, cup powdered sugar, one and a half cups flour, one and a half teaspoons baking powder, salt.

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