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" You looked over a very low fence of white cravat (whereof no man had ever beheld the tie, for he fastened it behind), and there it lay, a valley between two jutting heights of collar, serene and whiskerless before you. It seemed to say, on the part of... "
The New Mirror - Page 184
1843
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Jugel's universal magazine, ed. by F.A. Catty

1843
...were his enemies: the shadows cast by his brightness; that was all. His very throat was moral. You saw a good deal of it. You looked over a very low fence of white cravat (whereof no man had ever beheld the tie, for he fastened it behind), and there it lay, a valley between two jutting heights...
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The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit: His Relatives, Friends and ...

Charles Dickens - 1844 - 905 pages
...were his enemies; the shadows cast by his brightness; that was all. His very throat was moral. You saw a good deal of it. You looked over a very low fence of white cravat (whereof no man had ever beheld the lie, for he fastened it behind), and there it lay, a valley between two jutting heights...
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Works, Volume 6

Charles Dickens - 1844
...were his enemies; the shadows cast by his brightness; that was all. His very throat was moral. You saw a good deal of it. You looked over a very low fence of white cravat (whereof no man bad ever beheld the tie, for he fastened it behind), and there it lay, a valley between two jutting...
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The North British Review, Volume 3

English literature - 1845
...were his enemies — the shadows cast by his brightness ; that was all. His very throat was moral. You saw a good deal of it. You looked over a very low fence of white cravat (whereof no man had ever beheld the tie, for he fastened it behind,) and there it lay, a valley between two jutting heights...
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The Novels and Tales of Charles Dickens, (Boz.).

Charles Dickens - 1846
...were his enemies; the shadows cast by his brightness ; that was all. His very throat was moral. You saw a good deal of it You looked over a very low fence of white cravat (whereof no man had ever beheld the tic, for he fastened it behind), and there it lay, a valley between two jutting heights...
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The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit, Volume 1

Charles Dickens - Avarice - 1858 - 438 pages
...his brightness ; that was all. His' very throat was moral. You saw a good deal of it. You lookedover a very low fence of white cravat (whereof no man had ever beheld the tie, for he fastened it behind), and there it lay, a valley between two jutting heignts...
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A class-book of English prose, with biogr. notices, explanatory notes and ...

Robert Demaus - 1859
...were his enemies ; the shadows ast by his brightness ; that was all. His very throat was moral. rou saw a good deal of it. You looked over a very low fence of 'hite cravat (whereof no man had ever beheld the tie, for he fasened it behind), and there it lay,...
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The Prose and Prose Writers of Britain from Chaucer to Ruskin: With ...

Robert Demaus - English literature - 1860 - 552 pages
...were his enemies ; the shadows east by his brightness ; that was all. His very throat was moral. You saw a good deal of it. You looked over a very low fence of white cravat (whereof no man had ever beheld the tie, for he fastened it behind), and there it lay, a valley between two jutting heights...
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Works. Libr. ed, Volume 1

Charles Dickens - 1861
...were his enemies ; the shadows cast by his brightness ; that was all. His very throat was moral. You saw a good deal of it. You looked over a very low fence of white cravat (whereof no man had ever beheld the tie, for he fastened it behind), and there it lay, a valley between two jutting heights...
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Works. Libr. ed, Volume 1

Charles Dickens - 1861
...were his enemies; the shadows cast by his brightness; that was all. His very throat was moral. You saw a good deal of it. You looked over a very low fence of white cravat (whereof no man had ever beheld the tie, for he fastened it behind), and there it lay, a valley between two jutting heights...
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