The Faerie Queene, Book Five

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Hackett Publishing, 2006 - 224 pages

Book Five of The Faerie Queene is Spenser's Legend of Justice. It tells of the knight Artegall's efforts to rid Faerie Land of tyranny and injustice, aided by his sidekick Talus and the timely intervention of his betrothed, the woman warrior Britomart. As allegory, Book Five figures forth ideal concepts of justice and explores how justice may be applied in a real world complicated by social inequality, female rule, political guile, and excessive violence. At the same time, as historical allegory, it retells a number of the most important events of early modern England, in particular the controversies surrounding the colonization of Ireland. An integral part of the larger poem, Book Five also stands on its own as one of the most challenging meditations on justice in English literature.

 

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The faerie queene

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Books one and five (two, three, and four are coming later-figure that one out) of Spenser's opus get the red-carpet treatment. Each volume has an introduction, annotations, bibliography, glossary to ... Read full review

The faerie queene

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Books one and five (two, three, and four are coming later-figure that one out) of Spenser's opus get the red-carpet treatment. Each volume has an introduction, annotations, bibliography, glossary to ... Read full review

Contents

Abbreviations
vii
Introduction
ix
Dedication
2
Proem
3
Canto One
7
Canto Two
17
Canto Three
33
Canto Four
45
Canto Nine
118
Canto Ten
133
Canto Eleven
145
Canto Twelve
165
The Letter to Raleigh
178
The Life of Edmund Spenser
182
Textual Notes
185
Glossary
186

Canto Five
60
Canto Six
77
Canto Seven
89
Canto Eight
103

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Page 3 - So oft as I with state of present time The image of the antique world compare, When as mans age was in his freshest prime, And the first blossome of faire vertue bare ; Such oddes I finde twixt those, and these which are, As that, through long continuance of his course, Me seemes the world is runne quite out of square From the first point of his appointed sourse ; And being once amisse growes daily wourse and wourse...

About the author (2006)

Abraham Stoll is Assistant Professor of English, University of San Diego.

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