Beacon Lights of History: Great women

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Fords, Howard and Hulbert, 1885 - History

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Page 31 - The barge she sat in, like a burnish'd throne, Burn'd on the water : the poop was beaten gold ; Purple the sails, and so perfumed, that The winds were love-sick with them : the oars were silver ; Which to the tune of flutes kept stroke, and made The water, which they beat, to follow faster, As amorous of their strokes.
Page 101 - My bounty is as boundless as the sea, My love as deep; the more I give to thee, The more I have, for both are infinite.
Page 495 - MAY I join the choir invisible Of those immortal dead who live again In minds made better by their presence: live In pulses stirred to generosity, In deeds of daring rectitude, in scorn For miserable aims that end with self. In thoughts sublime that pierce the night like stars, And with their mild persistence urge man's search To vaster issues.
Page 77 - But little do men perceive what solitude is, and how far it extendeth. For a crowd is not company, and faces are but a gallery of pictures, and talk but a tinkling cymbal, where there is no love.
Page 32 - A seeming mermaid steers: the silken tackle Swell with the touches of those flower-soft hands , That yarely frame the office. From the barge A strange invisible perfume hits the sense Of the adjacent wharfs. The city cast Her people out upon her; and Antony, Enthron'd i...
Page 39 - Queen, enfold me, Hush thy sobs and bow thine ear, Listen to the great heart-secrets Thou, and thou alone, must hear. Though my scarred and veteran legions Bear their eagles high no more, And my wrecked and scattered galleys Strew dark Actium's fatal shore; Though no glittering guards surround me, Prompt to do their master's will, I must perish like a Roman, Die the great Triumvir still.
Page 101 - You see me, Lord Bassanio, where I stand, Such as I am: though for myself alone I would not be ambitious in my wish To wish myself much better, yet for you I would be trebled twenty times myself, A thousand times more fair, ten thousand times More rich; That only to stand high in your account, I might in virtues, beauties, livings, friends, Exceed account.
Page 496 - ... you must learn to fix your mind on that end, and not on what will happen to you because of it. And remember, if you were to choose something lower, and make it the rule of your life to seek your own pleasure and escape from what is disagreeable, calamity might come just the same; and it would be calamity falling on a base mind, which is the one form of sorrow that, has no balm in it, and that may well make a man say, — ' It would have been better for me if I had never been born.
Page 440 - ... to move contentedly in the plain path which Providence has obviously marked out to the sex, and in which custom has for the most part rationally confirmed them, rather than to stray awkwardly, unbecomingly, and unsuccessfully in a forbidden road ? Is it not desirable to be the lawful possessors of a lesser domestic territory, rather than the turbulent usurpers of a wider foreign empire ? to be good originals, than bad imitators?
Page 431 - ... blame ; not one in ten able to get a chair ; protesting they are engaged to ten other places ; and lamenting the fatigue they are not obliged to endure ; ten or a dozen card-tables crammed with dowagers of quality, grave ecclesiastics and yellow admirals : and you have an idea of an assembly. I never go to these things when I can possibly avoid it, and stay when there as few minutes as I can.

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