State Papers and Publick Documents of the United States, from the Accession of George Washington to the Presidency: Exhibiting a Complete View of Our Foreign Relations Since that Time ...

Front Cover
Thomas B. Wait, 1817 - United States
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 130 - ... and in any such action the defendant may plead the general issue, and give this Act and the special matter in evidence at any trial to be had thereupon...
Page 204 - ... to hold the union of the States as the basis of their peace and happiness; to support the Constitution, which is the cement of the Union, as well in its limitations as in its authorities; to respect the rights and authorities reserved to the States and to the people as equally incorporated with and essential to the success of the general system; to avoid the slightest interference with the rights of conscience or the functions of religion, so wisely exempted from civil jurisdiction...
Page 227 - An act to interdict the commercial intercourse between the United States and Great Britain and France and their dependencies, and for other purposes...
Page 372 - Among the commercial abuses still committed under the American flag, and leaving in force my former reference to that subject, it appears that American citizens are instrumental in carrying on a traffic in enslaved Africans, equally in violation of the laws of humanity and in defiance of those of their own country. The same just and benevolent motives which produced the interdiction in force against this criminal conduct will doubtless be felt by Congress in devising further means of suppressing...
Page 17 - Places; but also from one Place belonging to an Enemy, to another Place belonging to an Enemy, whether they be under the Jurisdiction of the same Prince or under Several...
Page 468 - Sir, that the Decrees of Berlin and Milan are revoked, and that after the first of November they will cease to have effect; it being understood that, in consequence of this declaration, the English shall revoke their Orders in Council, and renounce the new principles of blockade, which they have wished to establish ; or that the United States, conformably to the Act which you have just communicated, shall cause their rights to be respected by the English.
Page 91 - To stop and detain all vessels loaded wholly or in part with corn, flour, or meal, bound to any port in France, or any port occupied by the armies of France...
Page 115 - November, one thousand seven hundred and sixty-five, there shall be raised, levied, collected, and paid unto his Majesty, his heirs, and successors...
Page 283 - Finding that in your reply of the 4th instant, you have used a language, which cannot be understood, but as reiterating and even aggravating the same gross insinuation, it only remains, in order to preclude opportunities, which are thus abused, to inform you that no further communications will be received from you, and that the necessity of this determination will, without delay, be made known to your government.
Page 420 - After the explicit and peremptory asseveration that this Government had no such knowledge, and that with such '•knowledge no such arrangement would have been entered into, the view which you have again presented of the subject makes it my duty to apprize you, that such insinuations are inadmissible in the intercourse of a Foreign Minister with a Government that understands what it owes to itself," Whatever was the sense in which Mr.

Bibliographic information