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A E NE I DOS

LIBRI VII-XII.

LIB ER VI I.

The nurse of Aeneas dies, and gives name to Caieta (see A. 6, 901).

After which he sails northwards, 1-9. By the favour of Neptune, the fleet is wafted safe, during the night, past Circaei, the supposed residence of the sorceress Circe—in Virgil's time, joined to the mainland-though they hear the sounds of the beasts, into which the potions of the goddess have changed her unhappy visitors, 10-24. At dawn, they enter the mouth of the Tiber, 25-36. About to narrate the war between the Trojans and the Latins, Virgil invokes the Muse, 37-44. Latinus was formerly king of the country, and had one daughter, for whose hand Turnus was a suitor, favoured by her mother Amata, 44-57. The marriage, however, was opposed by various evil portents, 57-80. Latinus consults the oracle of Faunus at Albunea, of which the precise locality is disputed, and is warned that he must give his daughter in marriage to a stranger, 81-101. This response was well known in Latium when Aeneas arrived, 102-106. Aeneas and his chiefs going on shore and feasting, eat the bread which Iulus sportively calls their tables, and thus the dreadful prophecy of the Harpies (A. 3, 255, &c.) is explained away, 107-119. Overjoyed, Aeneas proclaims a solemn festival in honour of the gods, their distinct place of settlement being now ascertained, 120-147. Next day, after partially exploring the Tiber, and the adjoining Numicius, Aeneas sends deputies to Laurentum (see A. 6, 891), where they find the youth engaged in various sports, 148-165. Latinus admits the Trojans to an interview, and proffers them hospitable shelter, 166-211. Informed that they want a settlement and peace, Latinus deems that Aeneas is the stranger referred to by the oracle, offers him his daughter in marriage, and dismisses the deputies with costly presents, 212-285. Juno, flying through the heavens, sees that the Tro have deserted the ships, and determines, if she cannot prevent their ultimate success, to retard it by war, 286-322. She summons from the lower world the Fury Allecto,

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