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Books Books 1 - 10 of 118 on He is not affected by the reality of distress touching his heart, but by the showy....
" He is not affected by the reality of distress touching his heart, but by the showy resemblance of it striking his imagination. He pities the plumage, but forgets the dying bird. "
Douglas Jerrold's Shilling Magazine - Page 47
edited by - 1846
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Memoirs of the Life of Thomas Paine: With Observations on His Writings ...

W. T. Sherwin - Authors, English - 1819 - 232 pages
...employing his talents to corrupt himself. Nature has been kinder to Mr. Burke than he is to her. He is not affected by the reality of distress touching his heart, but by the shewy resemblance of it striking his imagination. He pities the plumage, but forgets the dying bird...
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The political works of Thomas Paine

Thomas Paine - 1826
...kinder to Mr. Burke than he has to her. He is not affected by the reality of distress touching upon his heart, but by the showy resemblance of it striking...genuine soul of nature forsakes him. His hero or his heroime must be a tragedy victim, expiring, in show, and not the real prisoner of misery, sliiling...
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The Political Works of Thomas Paine: Secretary for Foreign Affairs to the ...

Thomas Paine - Political science - 1826 - 425 pages
...kinder to Mr. Burke than he has to her. He is not affected by the reality of distress touching upon his heart, but by the showy resemblance of it striking...genuine soul of nature forsakes him. His hero or his heroime must be a tragedy rictim, expiring, in show, and not, the real prisoner of misery, sliding...
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An exposition of the mysteries or religious dogmas and customs of the ...

John Fellows - 1835
...talents to corrupt himself. Nature has been kinder to Mr. Burke than he has been to her. He is, not affected by the reality of distress touching his heart,...nature forsakes him. His hero or his heroine must be a tra" gidy-vietem, expiring in show, and not the real prisoner of misery, sliding into death in the...
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An Exposition of the Mysteries; Or, Religious Dogmas and Customs of the ...

John Fellows - Druids and Druidism - 1835 - 403 pages
...talents to corrupt himself. Nature has been kinder to Mr. Burke than he has been to her. He is not affected by the reality of distress touching his heart,...Accustomed to kiss the aristocratical hand that hath pnrloined him from himself, he degenerates into a composition of art, and the genuine soul of nature...
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An Exposition of the Mysteries; Or, Religious Dogmas and Customs of the ...

John Fellows - 1835 - 403 pages
...talents to corrupt himself. Nature haa been kinder to Mr. Burke than he has been to her. He is not affected by the reality of distress touching his heart, but by the showy resemblance of it striking hi* imagination. He pities the plumage, but forgets the dying bird. Accustomed to kiss the aristocratical...
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The Life of Thomas Paine: Author of "Common Sense", "Rights of Man", "Age of ...

Gilbert Vale - Political scientists - 1841 - 192 pages
...employing his talents to corrupt himself. Nature has been kinder to Mr. Burke than he is to her. He is not affected by the reality of distress touching his heart,...but forgets the dying bird. Accustomed to kiss the aristocratic hand that hath purloined him from himself, he degenerates into a composition of art, and...
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The Christian reformer; or, Unitarian magazine and review [ed. by R. Aspland].

Robert Aspland - 1842
...corrupt himself. Nature has been kinder to Mr. Burke than he is to her. He is not affected by the realily of distress touching his heart, but by the showy resemblance...bird. Accustomed to kiss the aristocratical hand that ham purloined him from himself, he degenerates into a composition of art, and the genuine soul of nature...
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The French Revolution, Volume 1

Charles MacFarlane - France - 1844
...employing his talents to corrupt himself. Nature has been kinder to Mr. Burke than he is to her. He is not affected by the reality of distress touching his heart,...Accustomed to kiss the aristocratical hand that hath purHoned him from himself, he degenerates into a composition of art, and the genuine soul of nature...
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SHILLING MAGAZINE

DOUGLAS JERROLD - 1846
...employing his talents to corrupt himself. Nature has been kinder to Mr. Burke than he is to her. He is not affected by the reality of distress touching his heart,...He pities the plumage,- but forgets the dying bird. Aecustomed to kiss the aristoeratic;i 1 hand that hath purloined him from himself, he degenerates into...
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