The life, times and scientific labours of the second marquis of Worcester. To which is added, a repr. of his Century of inventions, 1663, with a commentary thereon

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Bernard Quaritch, 1866 - Industrial arts - 624 pages
 

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Page 151 - A CENTURY OF THE NAMES AND SCANTLINGS OF SUCH INVENTIONS, as at present I can call to mind to have tried and perfected...
Page 152 - An admirable and most forcible way to drive up water by fire, not by drawing or sucking it upwards, for that must be as the philosopher calleth it, infra spheeram activitatis, which is but at such a distance. But this way hath no bounder, if the vessels be strong enough ; for I have taken a piece of a whole cannon, whereof the end was burst, and filled it three...
Page 125 - I have sat among their learned men, for that honour I had, and been counted happy to be born in such a place of philosophic freedom as they supposed England was, while themselves did nothing but bemoan the servile condition into which learning amongst them was brought ; that this was it which had damped the glory of Italian wits, that nothing had been there written now these many years but flattery and fustian. There it was that I found and visited the famous Galileo, grown old, a prisoner to the...
Page 119 - He publicly denied that he employed Papists : at the same time he privately sent to his generals directions to employ every Papist that would serve. He publicly took the sacrament at Oxford, as a pledge that he never would even connive at Popery : he privately assured his wife, that he intended to tolerate Popery in England ; and he authorised Lord Glamorgan to promise that Popery should be established in Ireland.
Page 51 - ... for the King, who might be able to repay it, than to have it taken from him by the other party; which would be hardly questionable if they prevailed.
Page 43 - Worcester's, was this day read the third time and, upon the question, passed ; and ordered to be sent unto the Lords for their concurrence." Oliver himself, as we shall find, has been dangerously sick. This is what Clement Walker, the splenetic Presbyterian, " an elderly gentleman of low stature, in a gray suit, with a little stick in his hand...
Page 42 - After dinner, my Lord Chancellor and his lady carried me in their coach to see their palace (for he now lived at Worcester-House in the Strand), building at the upper end of St. James's street, and to project the garden.
Page 44 - King,"' as they sometimes undertook, ' they have settled a Crown-Revenue ' upon Oliver, and have made him as glorious a King as ever ' John of Leyden was !'3* A very splenetic old gentleman in gray ; — verging towards Pride's Purge, and lodgment in the Tower, I think ! He is from the West ; known long since in Gloucester Siege ; Member now for Wells ; but terminates in the Tower, with ink, and abundant gall in it, to write the History of Independency there.
Page 58 - I care not how little I say in that business of Ireland, since those strange powers and instructions given to your favourite Glamorgan, which appear to be so inexcusable to justice, piety, and prudence. And I fear there is very much in that transaction of Ireland, both before and since, that you and I were never thought wise enough to be advised with in. Oh! Mr. Secretary, those stratagems have given me more sad hours than all the...
Page 6 - Vauxhall, beyond the palace of the Archbishop of Canterbury, to see an hydraulic machine invented by my Lord Somerset, Marquis of Worcester. It raises water more than forty geometrical feet, by the power of one man only ; and in a very short space of time will draw up four vessels of water through a tube or channel not more than a span in width...

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