Lives of Scottish Worthies: James I [pt. 2]. Robert Henryson. William Dunbar. Gavin Douglas. Sir David Lindsay. Antiquarian illustrations

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Page 161 - In consecrated earth And on the holy hearth The Lars and Lemures moan with midnight plaint ; In urns, and altars round A drear and dying sound Affrights the Flamens at their service quaint ; And the chill marble seems to sweat, While each peculiar Power...
Page 161 - The lonely mountains o'er And the resounding shore A voice of weeping heard, and loud lament; From haunted spring and dale Edged with poplar pale The parting Genius is with sighing sent; With flower-inwoven tresses torn The Nymphs in twilight shade of tangled thickets mourn.
Page 309 - James, be the grace of God, King of Scottis, to all and...
Page 160 - The oracles are dumb, No voice or hideous hum Runs through the arched roof in words deceiving Apollo from his shrine Can no more divine, With hollow shriek the steep of Delphos leaving No nightly trance, or breathed spell, Inspires the pale-eyed priest from the prophetic cell...
Page 234 - And of another, in the year 1409, which lasted eight days, and was of matter from the creation of the world, whereat was present most part of the nobility and gentry of England.
Page 75 - among us moderns, James, King of Scotland, who not only composed many sacred pieces of vocal music, but also of himself invented a new kind of music, plaintive and melancholy, different from all others, in which he has been imitated by Carlo Gesualdo, Prince of Venosa, who, in our age, has improved music with new and admirable inventions,
Page 161 - And sullen Moloch, fled, Hath left in shadows dread His burning idol all of blackest hue ; In vain with cymbals' ring They call the grisly king, In dismal dance about 'the furnace blue ; The brutish gods of Nile as...
Page 77 - Henderson wittily obseruing, that Chaucer in his 5th booke had related the death of Troilus, but made no mention what became of Creseid, he learnedly takes vppon him in a fine poeticall way to expres the punishment & end due to a false vnconstant whore, which commonly terminates in extreme misery...
Page 59 - In her was youth, beauty, with humble port, Bounty, richesse, and womanly feature ; God better knows than my pen can report, Wisdom, largesse,* estate, f and cunning \ sure, In every point so guided her measure, In word, in deed, in shape, in countenance, That nature might no more her child advance.
Page 185 - In his political conduct Douglas supported a party which had been called into existence by the precipitate and imprudent marriage of the queen, and was animated by the selfish and often treacherous policy of the Earl of Angus. In his individual conduct he was pacifie, temperate, and forgiving ; but his secret correspondence with Henry VIII.

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