The European Magazine: And London Review, Volume 21

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Philological Society of London, 1792
 

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Page 213 - ... them in a superior manner did not always preserve, when they delineated individual nature. His portraits remind the spectator of the invention of history, and the amenity of landscape.
Page 432 - but you do not tell all the story. I think the cap was nevertheless an advantage to us, for it was the first thing that put our girls upon knitting worsted mittens for sale at Philadelphia, that they might have wherewithal...
Page 213 - Sir Joshua Reynolds was, on very many accounts, one of the most memorable men of his time. He was the first Englishman who added the praise of the elegant arts to the other glories of his country. In taste, in grace, in facility, in happy invention, and in the richness and harmony of colouring, he was equal to the great masters of the renowned ages.
Page 429 - I; that in the night she knew there came a post from Paris from the queen, and that she would be extremely glad to hear what the queen commanded the king in order to his affairs...
Page 432 - Upon the whole, I was more reconciled to this little piece of luxury, since not only the girls were made happier by having fine caps, but the Philadelphians by the supply of warm mittens.
Page 30 - every one acquainted with microscopes knows, that the more of them he looks through, the less the object will appear." " Why," replied the King, "this is not only telling an untruth, but telling it clumsily; for, if that be the case, every one who can look through a microscope will be able to detect him.
Page 29 - He was then asked whether there were better libraries at Oxford or Cambridge. He answered, he believed the Bodleian was larger than any they had at Cambridge; at the same time adding, " I hope, whether we have more books or not than they have at Cambridge, we shall make as good use of them as they do.
Page 7 - Whereas on the other side, if we maintain things that are established, we have not only to strive with a number of heavy prejudices deeply rooted in the hearts of men, who think that herein we serve the time, and speak in favour of the present state, because thereby we either hold or seek preferment; but also to bear such exceptions as minds so averted beforehand usually take against that which they are loth should be poured into them.
Page 429 - One day, in difcourfe, Lady — — -- tacitly " commended the knowledge of State affairs, and " that fome women were very happy in a good " underftanding thereof, as my Lady A. Lady S. " Mrs. T. and divers others, and that for it ** nobody was at...
Page 197 - East ; that he will survey the wonders of its ancient edifices, and trace the vestiges of its ruined cities ; and that, at his return, we shall know the arts and opinions of a race of men, from whom very little has been hitherto derived. " You, Sir, have no need of being told by me, how much may be added by your attention and patronage to experimental knowledge and natural history.

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