The Works of the Rev. Jonathan Swift, D.D. ...: With Notes, Historical and Critical

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Page 325 - But what success Vanessa met, Is to the world a secret yet. Whether the nymph, to please her swain, Talks in a high romantic strain; Or whether he at last descends To act with less seraphic ends; Or to compound the business, whether They temper love and books together; Must never to mankind be told, Nor shall the conscious Muse unfold.
Page 288 - A father, and the nymph his child. That innocent delight he took To see the virgin mind her book, Was but the master's secret joy In school to hear the finest boy.
Page 310 - I could have borne the rack much better than those killing, killing words of yours. Sometimes I have resolved to die without seeing you more ; but those resolves, to your misfortune, did not last long...
Page 310 - Oh ! that you may have but so much regard for me left that this complaint may touch your soul with pity. I say as little as ever I can ; did you but know what I thought, I am sure it would move you to forgive me ; and believe I cannot help telling you. this and live.
Page 63 - Swift went up to the ixnintry gentleman, and in a very abrupt manner, without any previous salute, asked him, " Pray, sir, do you remember any good weather in the world...
Page 223 - You know how well I loved both Lord Oxford and Bolingbroke, and how dear the Duke of Ormond is to me: do you imagine I can be easy while their enemies are endeavouring to take off their heads; I nunc, et versus tecum meditare canoros...
Page cxlvi - My hate, whose lash just Heaven has long decreed Shall on a day make sin and folly bleed...
Page 261 - You may see by this that you are not much injured by being supposed the author of this piece. If you are, you have disobliged us, and two or three of your best friends, in not giving us the least hint of it while you were with us; and in particular Dr Arbuthnot, who says it is ten thousand pities he had not known it, he could have added such abundance of things upon every subject.
Page 317 - What marks are there of a deity, but what you are to be known by? — you are present everywhere: your dear image is always before mine eyes. Sometimes you strike me with that prodigious awe, I tremble with fear; at other times a charming compassion shines through your countenance, which revives my soul.
Page 90 - Don't you remember how I used to be in pain when Sir William Temple would look cold and out of humour for three or four days, and I used to suspect a hundred reasons. I have plucked up my spirit since then, faith ; he spoiled a fine gentleman.

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