The Dramatic Works of William Congreve, Esq; in Two Volumes. ...

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S. Crowder, C. Ware, and T. Payne, 1773 - English drama (Comedy)
 

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Page 249 - My heart is pretty good; yet it beats; and my pulses, ha! — I have none — mercy on me! — hum — yes, here they are — gallop, gallop, gallop, gallop, gallop, gallop, hey! whither will they hurry me? — Now they're gone again — and now I'm faint again; and pale again, and, hem; and my, hem! — breath, hem!
Page 62 - Heaven, there's not a woman will give a man the pleasure of a chase ! my sport is always balked, or cut short ! I stumble over the game I would pursue. 'Tis dull and unnatural to have a hare run full in the hound's mouth, and would distaste the keenest hunter: I would have overtaken, not have met, my game.
Page 212 - No, indeed, he speaks truth now ; for as Tattle has pictures of all that have granted him favours, he has the pictures of all that have refused him ; if satires, descriptions, characters, and lampoons are pictures.
Page 243 - Well, and there's a handsome gentleman, and a fine gentleman, and a sweet gentleman, that was here that loves me, and I love him; and if he sees you speak to me any more, he'll thrash your jacket for you, he will, you great sea-calf. BEN What, do you mean that fair-weather spark that was here just now? Will he thrash my jacket? - Let'n, - let'n, - But an he comes near me, mayhap I may giv'na salt eel for's supper, for all that.
Page 255 - We're merry folks, we sailors, we han't much to care for. Thus we live at sea ; eat biscuit, and drink flip ; put on a clean shirt once a quarter — come home and lie with our landladies once a year, get rid of a little money ; and then put off with the next fair wind.
Page 267 - ... en: — so faith I told'n in plain terms, if I were minded to marry I'd marry to please myself, not him: and for the young woman that he provided for me, I thought it more fitting for her to learn her sampler and make dirt-pies, than to look after a husband; for my part I was none of her man.
Page 243 - Nay, you say true in that, it's but a folly to lie : for to speak one thing, and to think just the contrary way; is as it were, to look one way, and to row another. Now, for my part d'ye see, I'm for carrying things above board, I'm not for keeping anything under hatches, - so that if you ben't as willing as I, say so a...
Page 221 - Excuse! Impudence! Why, sirrah, mayn't I do what I please? Are not you my slave? Did not I beget you? And might not I have chosen whether I would have begot you or no? 'Oons, who are you? Whence came you?
Page 33 - Gazette! Why there again now. Why, sir, there are not three words of truth the year round put into the Gazette. I'll tell you a strange thing now as to that. You must know, sir, I was resident in Flanders the last campaign, had a small post there, but no matter for that.
Page 100 - Mellefont,) is a gull, and made a fool, and cheated. Is every man a gull and a fool that is deceived ? At that rate I am afraid the two classes of men will be reduced to one, and the knaves themselves be at a loss to justify their title : but if an open-hearted honest man, who has an entire confidence in one whom he takes to be his friend, and...

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