A Companion to the Great Western Schism (1378-1417)

Front Cover
JoŽlle Rollo-Koster, Thomas M. Izbicki
BRILL, 2009 - Religion - 467 pages
The division of the Church or Schism that took place between 1378 and 1417 had no precedent in Christianity. No conclave since the twelfth century had acted as had those in April and September 1378, electing two concurrent popes. This crisis was neither an issue of the authority claimed by the pope and the Holy Roman Emperor nor an issue of authority and liturgy. The Great Western Schism was unique because it forced upon Christianity a rethinking of the traditional medieval mental frame. It raised question of personality, authority, human fallibility, ecclesiastical jurisdiction and taxation, and in the end responsibility in holding power and authority. This collection presents the broadest range of experiences, center and periphery, clerical and lay, male and female, Christian and Muslim. Theology, including exegesis of Scripture, diplomacy, French literature, reform, art, and finance all receive attention.
 

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Contents

II
1
III
9
IV
67
V
89
VI
123
VII
159
VIII
197
IX
239
XI
333
XII
375
XIII
395
XIV
443
XV
447
XVI
455
XVII
459
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Jo lle Rollo-Koster, Ph.D. (1992) in History, SUNY Binghamton, is Professor of Medieval History at the University of Rhode Island. She has published on the papacy, papal Avignon, and the Great Western Schism, including her most recent "Raiding Saint Peter: Empty Sees, Violence, and the Initiation of the Great Western Schism (1378)" (Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2008). Thomas M. Izbicki, Ph.D. (1973) in History, Cornell University, is a Humanities Librarian at Rutgers University. He has published on the late medieval papacy, including Pope Pius II, Cardinal Juan de Torquemada OP, and Cardinal Nicholas of Cusa. His most recent book is "Nicholas of Cusa, Writings on Church and Reform" (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2008).

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