The Edinburgh Review, Volume 63

Front Cover
A. and C. Black, 1836 - English literature
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 233 - But with me it is a very small thing that I should be judged of you, or of man's judgment: yea, I judge not mine own self. 4 For I know nothing by myself; yet am I not hereby justified: but he that judgeth me is the Lord.
Page 233 - Therefore judge nothing before the time, until the Lord come, ' who both will bring to light the hidden things of darkness, and will make manifest the counsels of the hearts : and then shall every man have praise of God.
Page 488 - Majesty that it may be enacted, and be it enacted . . . that whereas by reason of some defects in the law poor people are not restrained from going from one parish to another, and therefore do endeavour to settle themselves in those parishes where there is the best stock, the largest commons or wastes to build cottages, and the most woods for them to burn and destroy...
Page 500 - ... for setting to work all such persons, married or unmarried, having no means to maintain them , and use no ordinary and daily trade of life to get their living by...
Page 146 - Renews the life of joy in happiest hours. It is a little thing to speak a phrase Of common comfort which by daily use Has almost lost its sense ; yet on the ear Of him who thought to die unmourned 'twill fall Like choicest music...
Page 304 - LORD, by whom we escape death. 21 GOD shall wound the head of his enemies, and the hairy scalp of such a one as goeth on still in his wickedness. 22 The LORD hath said, I will bring my people again, as I did from Basan, mine own will I bring again, as I did sometime from the deep of the sea.
Page 499 - ... the condition of any pauper class is elevated above the condition of independent labourers, the condition of the independent class is depressed; their industry is impaired, their employment becomes unsteady, and its remuneration in wages is diminished. Such persons, therefore, are under the strongest inducements to quit the less eligible class of labourers, and enter the more eligible class of paupers.
Page 146 - More exquisite than when nectarean juice Renews the life of joy in happiest hours. It is a little thing to speak a phrase Of common comfort which by daily use Has almost lost its sense ; yet on the ear Of him who thought to die...
Page 503 - If the claimant does not comply with the terms on which relief is given to the destitute, he gets nothing ; and if he does comply, the compliance proves the truth of the claim — namely, his destitution.
Page 150 - Think upon the time When the clear depths of thy yet lucid soul Were ruffled with the troublings of strange joy, As if some unseen visitant from heaven Touch'd the calm lake and wreath'd its images In sparkling waves...

Bibliographic information