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Peracleus Maro, Teblece

Clarendon Press Series

VIRGIL

AENEID, BOOKS X-XII

EDITED

WITH INTRODUCTION AND NOTES

BY

T. L. PAPILLON, M.A.

FORMERLY FELLOW AND TUTOR OF NEW COLLEGE

AND

A. E. HAIGH, M.A.

LATE FELLOW OF HERTFORD, AND CLASSICAL LECTURER AT CORPUS CHRISTI

AND WADHAM COLLEGES, OXFORD

Oxford

AT THE CLARENDON PRESS

1891

[All rights reserved]

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Latin Blackwell 7-25-27. 15228.

PREFACE.

The text of this edition (as of the former edition published by the Clarendon Press in 1882) is based upon that of Ribbeck with certain modifications, particularly in matters of orthography. No attempt is made to reproduce the variety of spelling found in the best MSS.-e. g. inpius, impius, navis (n. plur.) naves, lacruma lacrima, volnus vulnus, vortex vertex, linquont linquunt lincunta variety which it is hard to believe that Virgil himself would have sanctioned. Where MSS. and inscriptions fluctuate between different forms (e.g. -es, -is, -eis, in nom. plur. of i- stems), it seems best for practical purposes to adhere to the normal spelling of the language in its fixed literary form: avoiding on the one hand the conventional spelling of the Renaissance Scholars, with barbarisms such as coelum, coena, lacryma, sylva due to the false notion that Latin was derived from Greek; nor claiming, on the other hand, either to reproduce the text exactly as Virgil wrote it or to decide on a priori grounds what he ought to have written.

The Commentary has been revised throughout by both Editors, and to a considerable extent re-written, with the object of making it more generally useful to students at the Universities and in the higher forms of schools. The Introduction has been abridged by Mr. Papillon from that of the former edition : most of the discussion upon the history of the

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text and upon Latin orthography being omitted as being outside the scope of such an edition as this.

In the preparation of the first edition the books principally used were Professor Conington's standard commentary, completed by Professor Nettleship; the editions of Forbiger, Gossrau, and Kennedy; Professor Nettleship's 'Suggestions Introductory to a Study of the Aeneid,' and Professor Sellar's volume On the Roman Poets of the Augustan Age.' In revising the notes the Editors have had the advantage of consulting Mr. Sidgwick's school edition, from which they have derived many valuable suggestions. The original Editor desires also to repeat his special obligation to the Venerable Edwin Palmer, D.D., Archdeacon of Oxford and Canon of Christ Church, formerly Fellow and Tutor of Balliol College ; to whose lectures on Virgil he looks back as the foundation and stimulus of any Virgilian learning that he possesses, and by the use of whose MS. notes he was much assisted in compiling the former edition.

T. L. P.
A. E. H.

LIFE AND POEMS OF VIRGIL1.

1. PUBLIUS VERGILIUS MARO was born Oct. 15th, B.C. 70, at Andes, a 'pagus' or country district near Mantua and the river Mincius, whose green banks and slow windings are recalled with affectionate memory in the Eclogues and Georgics. His parents were of obscure social position: but, like those of Horace, were able to appreciate their son's talent, and give him the best education then obtainable. At twelve years old he was sent to Cremona : and at sixteen, on assuming the 'toga virilis,' went to Mediolanum (Milan) for one year, removing thence to Rome in 53 B.C.; where he studied rhetoric under Epidius, and philosophy under Siron, a celebrated teacher of Epicureanism. In one of the collection of short poems known as 'Catalepton' (тà κarà λeñτóv, ‘minor poems') or Catalecta (karaλektá, ‘selections'), perhaps composed during his stay at Rome, Virgil expresses his preference for philosophy over rhetoric:

Ite hinc, inanes, ite, rhetorum ampullae,
Inflata rore non Achaico verba,

Et vos, Stiloque, Tarquitique, Varroque,
Scholasticorum natio

Nos ad beatos vela mittimus portus,

Magni petentes docta dicta Sironis 2.

Traces of the poet's early taste for philosophy, here first expressed, appear in a few well-known passages of his later poems, e.g. the song of Silenus in Ecl. vi; the references to didactic poetry in G. ii. 477 sqq.; the song of Iopas, Aen. i. 742-6; and the exposition of the 'Anima Mundi,' Aen. vi. 724 sqq.; as also in his admiration for and intimate acquaintance with the writings of Lucretius.

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In this edition the English spelling 'Virgil' is retained in preference to the less familiar Vergil,' used by some modern editors. The Latin form of the poet's name is 'Vergilius': but the Anglicised form 'Virgil' has (like 'Horace,' 'Livy,' ' Athens' &c.) the sanction of long usage, and is as legitimate for us as 'Virgilio' for Italians, or 'Virgile' for Frenchmen. 2 Catal. vii.

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