Agricultural Botany: An Enumeration and Description of Useful Plants and Weeds, which Merit the Notice, Or Require the Attention, of American Agriculturists

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J.W. Moore, 1847 - Botany - 270 pages

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Page 172 - By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion. We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof. For there they that carried us away captive required of us a song ; and they that wasted us required of us mirth, saying, Sing us one of the songs of Zion.
Page 42 - Yet nature is made better by no mean, But nature makes that mean : so, over that art, Which, you say, adds to nature, is an art That nature makes. You see, sweet maid, we marry A gentler scion to the wildest stock ; And make conceive a bark of baser kind ]5y bud of nobler race: This is an art Which does mend nature, — change it rather: but The art itself is nature.
Page 183 - The beauties of the wilderness are his, That make so gay the solitary place Where no eye sees them. And the fairer forms That cultivation glories in, are his. He sets the bright procession on its way, And marshals all the order of the year. He marks the bounds which winter may not pass, And blunts his pointed fury. In its case Russet and rude, folds up the tender germ Uninjured, with inimitable art, And ere one flowery season fades and dies Designs the blooming wonders of the next.
Page 85 - Harry, I do not only marvel where thou spendest thy time, but also how thou art accompanied : for though the camomile, the more it is trodden on, the faster it grows, yet youth, the more it is wasted, the sooner it wears.
Page 204 - It shoots from the base of its stem a thread-like fibre, which descends perpendicularly 6 to 18 inches, and then produces a small tuber. From this, horizontal fibres extend in every direction, producing new tubers at intervals of 6 or 8 inches, and these immediately shoot up stems to the surface of the earth, and throw out lateral fibres to form a new progeny. This process...
Page 204 - ... new progeny. This process is interminable, — and it is curious to see what a chain or net-work of plants and tubers can, with some care, be dug up in a loose soil. The only process, yet discovered, by which this grass can be extirpated, is to plough or hoe the spots in which it grows every day through the whole season. In their perpetual efforts to throw their leaves to the light, the roots become exhausted and perish, — or if a few appear the next spring, they can easily be dug up.
Page 131 - This is an exceedingly pernicious weed, — and so tenacious of life that it is almost impossible to get rid of it, when once fully introduced. It grows in patches, so thickly as to deter Stock from feeding among it, and even to monopolize the soil, — while its roots gradually extend around, and to a great depth. It is a native of the Southern States, — but has found its way to several localities in Pennsylvania.
Page 243 - The wild mushrooms are found in parks and pastures, where the turf has not been ploughed up for many years, and the best time for gathering them is August and September.
Page 183 - That make so gay the solitary place Where no eye sees them. And the fairer forms That cultivation glories in, are His. He sets the bright procession on its way, And marshals all the order of the year. He marks the bounds which 'Winter may not pass, And blunts his pointed fury. In its case, Russet and rude, folds up the tender germ Uninjured, with inimitable art, And, ere one flowery season fades and dies, Designs the blooming wonders of the next.
Page 183 - The grand transition, that there lives and works A soul in all things, and that soul is God. The beauties of the wilderness are his, That make so gay the solitary place Where no eye sees them.

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